Category Archives: Books

“…urban street fiction [can] build bridges between sanctioned and out-of-school texts … in efforts to further include, motivate, and facilitate meaningful instances of self-efficacy for all students…” (Marshall)

“Graphic novels … foster critical thinking by requiring students to simultaneously evaluate the interaction between multiple modes of communication. (Cook)

“teachers can use Science Fiction to provide catalysts for discussion in a variety of subjects; teach students how to question intelligently; and stimulate their imaginations…”  (Ontell)

SCC students are clamoring to read urban fiction, science fiction, mysteries, and graphic novels.  Can you donate some you’ve enjoyed?  Contact SCC Librarian, Judy Howe howej@scc.losrios.edu.

Works Cited – and more!

Cook, Michael. “The Big Picture.” Literacy Today (2411-7862) 33.3 (2015): 30-32. Professional Development Collection. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tfh&AN=110725998&site=eds-live&scope=site

Botzakis, Stergios. “Why I Teach Comics In Higher Education.” Knowledge Quest 41.3 (2013): 68-70. Library & Information Science Source. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lls&AN=84897668&site=eds-live&scope=site

Gibson, Simone. “Critical Readings: African American Girls And Urban Fiction.” Journal Of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 53.7 (2010): 565-574. Professional Development Collection. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tfh&AN=48996465&site=eds-live&scope=site

Marshall, Elizabeth, Jeanine Staples, and Simone Gibson. “Ghetto Fabulous: Reading Black Adolescent Femininity In Contemporary Urban Street Fiction.” Journal Of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 53.1 (2009): 28-36. Professional Development Collection. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tfh&AN=44054567&site=eds-live&scope=site

Ontell, Val. “Imagine That! Science Fiction As A Learning Motivation.” Community & Junior College Libraries 12.1 (2003): 57-70. Library & Information Science Source. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lls&AN=14813585&site=eds-live&scope=site

Watts, Pam. “Graphic Novels Offer Diverse Perspectives, Narratives.” Education Digest 81.2 (2015): 38-41. Professional Development Collection. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tfh&AN=109031695&site=eds-live&scope=site

LGBTQ book and dvd display
The SCC Library has a substantial collection of books and media on LGBTQ issues and topics on display through the month of April. Come and check out the display and borrow a book or video—second floor of the LRC, next to the stairwell. Learn about the Gay Rights Movement and the many symbols associated with the LGBTQ community.

Will you be participating in the Day of Silence?

Here’s what we’ve got on display:
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Tax season is upon us… A time when we find that we all could probably be managing our money better. Get some tips, and explore the larger issues, in the books currently on display on the 2nd floor of the LRC.
Books on display at the 2nd floor of the LRC

By the way, CRC will be hosting free drop-in tax preparation sessions for the next few Fridays. They do this every year! See details (PDF file).

Here are the books in our display:

Wondering what’s come in lately? Wonder no more. Our latest new books & DVDs list includes titles we received from November 2015 through the end of January. You can browse these by call number area or search by keyword. Click a title or book jacket to find its record in OneSearch and place a request. If you find a list of titles you like, click the email icon at the top to send yourself the list.

Asking for it : the alarming rise of rape culture--and what we can do about it by Kate Harding. The trouble with post-Blackness edited by Houston A. Baker and K. Merinda Simmons To the cloud : big data in a turbulent world / Vincent Mosco The republic of imagination : a life in books by Azar Nafisi The Peripheral by William Gibson Ida, a film by Paweł Pawlikowski

We post shorter lists of new books weekly, and new DVDs monthly. You’ll find those at the main New Books & DVDs page. You can get new books via email as well.

Library display. Poster says "I can't remember the title, but the cover was blue."
Librarians hear this sort of thing a lot. In fact, as I was starting to write this, a student told me that he couldn’t remember a book’s title or author but could picture it in his mind. At first it’s funny, because you can’t search our catalogs by color. But then, books have covers for a reason (even if you can’t judge a book by its cover, though we all know that sometimes you can).

Blue might not be mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey, but it gets around the English language. Take a look at the Oxford English Dictionary entry—it’s an endless scroll, encompassing melancholy, obscenity, sensuality, surprise.

So, whatever your mood as skies get greyer this month, stop by and check out a blue book from our display on the second floor of the LRC.

Michael Graves, buildings and projects, 1995-2003. edited by Karen Nichols Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace The Fault in Our Stars by John GreenThe death and life of the great American school system : how testing and choice are undermining education by Diane Ravitch

Imagining Black America by Michael Wayne. Edible : an adventure into the world of eating insects and the last great hope to save the planet by Daniella Martin Blasphemy by Sherman AlexieUkraine : an illustrated history by Paul Robert Magocsi.

Here’s a list of titles included in our November Blue books display:

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It’s time to buckle down and make progress on those research papers.

OneSearch, Los Rios Libraries

If you’re doing research, you’re probably spending some time in OneSearch, which is our main tool for finding books, articles and other library content.

So let’s cover a few tips here.

1. Understand how keywords work

Google makes us lazy; we can type any garbage we like into it and it seems to know more or less what we meant.

Google search for: where are tho hamtsers who eat tacos. Spelling corrected, includes relevant results about burritos

Library search tools are much more literal. All they do is match words. So, if you include a keyword and it’s not in the title or abstract or subjects—the item won’t show. That’s why:

 a search for methods of preventing domestic violence against women brings fewer than 40 results

Too many words! Plenty of articles on that subject don’t have some the words “method” or “against”, so they don’t show in results. Compare:

Query domestic violence prevention programs brings 4,000 results

Your keywords need to match content in the source, so start with just a few and add on!

2. Limit your results by format

By default, OneSearch will show you all different kinds of content. But what if you’re not interested in articles, and are only looking for books you can check out?

Don’t overwork your retina scanning the page. Instead, use the Books & Videos on Library Shelves limiter.

Books & Videos on Library Shelves limiter in OneSearch

Once you’ve done that, most of your results will be books. Were you told you need to find scholarly articles? You can limit to Scholarly (Peer-Reviewed) Journals. Check out the Source Types area for other options.

3. Email yourself ebook chapters

We have been plugging ebooks lately and for good reason—thousands of recently published academic titles are waiting for your attention.

Sometimes it’s not totally clear what to do with these, though. You can read them page by page online but that can be inconvenient. Sometimes the easiest thing is to email yourself a chapter. When you’re in the book, click Email Pages, then look for something labeled This section.

Email chapter of EBSCO ebook
There’s a limit to how many pages you can email yourself at a time, but usually a chapter or two is short enough. If you hit the limit, try later that day and you’ll find that the limit has been reset.

4. Save formatted citations

Is it fun making a Works Cited page? Maybe! But event then, you might want some help. When looking at an article, you’ll see a Cite link; click that and look what happens.

But wait, there’s more. If you’ve used EBSCO databases at all you probably have emailed yourself articles. Well take a look at the options on the email form and you’ll see that there’s something labeled Citation Format.

Email MLA citation in EBSCO record

What could it mean?

The citations aren’t always perfect, but they’re a good start. Remember, we’ve got citation tips over at our Research Guides page.

5. Don’t get frustrated by bad links

One of the things OneSearch does is bring together a bunch of different databases. So you’ll see links to JSTOR, ScienceDirect and others in your search results. Usually these links work, but sometimes…

404 page in ScienceDirect
Ask a Librarian - Live ChatDon’t despair! If a link appeared, usually it means that we do have the article, even if the link itself fails. So in that case you can click the Ask a Librarian icon and ask us to get you the article.

In general, use Ask A Librarian whenever you’re having problems—we’re here to help.

Featured Library Book – Come and Get It!

SCC Library New Book Shelves LB 2395.7 C38 2014

Minds on Fire book cover

Review from ChoiceEmphases added!

This book by Carnes (Barnard College, Columbia Univ.) examines perpetual intellectual disengagement of students in higher education, dating back to Plato and moving through European/American higher education, and asks the question, “Why are we so bored with higher education?”  Desperate to bring life to his courses, Carnes took a bold chance and created role-immersion games through which his students could enter the worlds and times of the subjects being studied.  When students’ investigative role-playing learning caused them to forget to leave at the end of class periods and they began to meet on Saturdays and Sundays to continue their experiences, Carnes and his fellow faculty and administration knew something revolutionary was happening.

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This semester we launched a new version of OneSearch, which provides access to our book & media collection and most of our research databases. I could tell you all about what it does and how to use it, but our friends at the Cosumnes River College Library made a video that does a much better job, in a very short amount of time, than I could hope to do. Enjoy! And tell your friendly librarians how you’re using it.

For students new to SCC, and for all students hoping to make the most of college opportunities, the SCC Library offers these services:

Ask a Librarian Chat Service.  Chat, phone, email, read FAQs, or come on in and talk to a friendly Librarian.

Grace and Judy at the Research Help Desk

Textbooks.  The Library has copies of many required textbooks for short term loan.  Ask for help at the Research Help Desk on the second floor of the Learning Resource Center.

Computers, Wi-Fi Connection, and Study Space.  Tables, study carrels, and study rooms on the 2nd floor and super quiet study space on the 3rd floor.

Library Workshops.  50-minute face-to-face workshops introduce you to library skills.  Sign up at the Research Help Desk or call to reserve your spot: 916-558-2461.  PILOT online tutorial, too.

Library Books and Videos You Can Borrow.  Check out a few of these to jump start your college life: