Category Archives: Just for fun

“…urban street fiction [can] build bridges between sanctioned and out-of-school texts … in efforts to further include, motivate, and facilitate meaningful instances of self-efficacy for all students…” (Marshall)

“Graphic novels … foster critical thinking by requiring students to simultaneously evaluate the interaction between multiple modes of communication. (Cook)

“teachers can use Science Fiction to provide catalysts for discussion in a variety of subjects; teach students how to question intelligently; and stimulate their imaginations…”  (Ontell)

SCC students are clamoring to read urban fiction, science fiction, mysteries, and graphic novels.  Can you donate some you’ve enjoyed?  Contact SCC Librarian, Judy Howe howej@scc.losrios.edu.

Works Cited – and more!

Cook, Michael. “The Big Picture.” Literacy Today (2411-7862) 33.3 (2015): 30-32. Professional Development Collection. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tfh&AN=110725998&site=eds-live&scope=site

Botzakis, Stergios. “Why I Teach Comics In Higher Education.” Knowledge Quest 41.3 (2013): 68-70. Library & Information Science Source. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lls&AN=84897668&site=eds-live&scope=site

Gibson, Simone. “Critical Readings: African American Girls And Urban Fiction.” Journal Of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 53.7 (2010): 565-574. Professional Development Collection. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tfh&AN=48996465&site=eds-live&scope=site

Marshall, Elizabeth, Jeanine Staples, and Simone Gibson. “Ghetto Fabulous: Reading Black Adolescent Femininity In Contemporary Urban Street Fiction.” Journal Of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 53.1 (2009): 28-36. Professional Development Collection. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tfh&AN=44054567&site=eds-live&scope=site

Ontell, Val. “Imagine That! Science Fiction As A Learning Motivation.” Community & Junior College Libraries 12.1 (2003): 57-70. Library & Information Science Source. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lls&AN=14813585&site=eds-live&scope=site

Watts, Pam. “Graphic Novels Offer Diverse Perspectives, Narratives.” Education Digest 81.2 (2015): 38-41. Professional Development Collection. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.  http://0-search.ebscohost.com.lasiii.losrios.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tfh&AN=109031695&site=eds-live&scope=site

piHow many digits of Pi have you memorized?

Come to LR220 on the 2nd floor of the LRC on Monday, March 14 at 1:59pm and show off your memorization skills. Or just come to watch the fun.

Sign up at the Research Help Desk on the 2nd floor of the LRC if you want to compete.

Prizes (print cards donated by the College Store):

  • 1st Prize: $10 print card and a pie donated by the Math Department
  • 2nd Prize: $5 print card
  • 3rd Prize: $1 print card

You can get started by memorizing the first million digits.

Guess the winners and you could win two movie passes! Entry forms available at the Academy Awards display on the 2nd floor of the LRC (look for the reels of film) and in the Instructional Media room on the first floor.
Film with dvds in the background

Did you know the library’s DVD collection has over 250 Oscar winners ready for checkout?

Study up on the nominees, and get your entry in before Oscar night (Feb. 28).

This Friday, November 20 in LR105, be part of International Games Day @ Your Library from 1-5 pm. An assortment of games, including Timeline, Star Fluxx, Sushi Go, Munchkin: Treasure Hunt, Trophy Buck, EcoFluxx and Choose One, will be on hand and ready to play!
International Games Day @ Your Library

This is a world-wide event. So join the global community and get your game on this Friday! Students, faculty, staff are all welcome.

Bust your stress and bust out some easy yoga poses, or try your hand at puzzles and coloring for added focus. Our list for you:

Breathe, stretch, and stabilize with a 20-minute yoga break in the LRC Lobby (no mat or special clothes are necessary) –

  • Thursday, May 14 @ 12:15
  • Monday, May 18 @ 12:15
  • Tuesday, May 19 @ 12:15
  • Wednesday, May 20 @ 12:15

Other fun things:

  • Enjoy jigsaw puzzles or color a beautiful design (crayons provided!): all floors May 11- 20
  • Pick up ear plugs at the Research Help Desk on the 2nd floor of the LRC.

The Library wishes our students all the best for much success in Spring 2015 Finals and beyond!

lotus flower

Guess the winners and you could win two movie passes!

Fill out your ballot at either the Instructional Media Desk on the 1st floor or
the Library Reference Desk on the 2nd floor of the Learning Resource Center.

Ties will be broken by a random drawing. Winners will be contacted by email.

The Academy Awards ceremony will be broadcast on February 22, 2015. Check out the nominees.

Oscar statuettes

Who knew old fashioned jigsaw puzzles would provide such a compelling study break?

Student doing jigsaw puzzle.

Peter Park recharges for his next study session.

Research suggests that relaxation exercises can help de-clutter the brain.1

Young woman doing jigsaw puzzle

Library puzzle captivates a future student.

Library staff set up puzzles

Karen and Stephanie love puzzles, too.

1Concordia University. “Spring-cleaning the mind? Study shows a cluttered brain doesn’t remember.” http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110419151445.htm (accessed December 8, 2014).

Welcome Karen Tercho, SCC’s newest librarian.  Karen brings experience as an adjunct librarian at the CRC Library as well as full-time work as solo librarian at Bryan University. We asked Karen to list “Five Things You Don’t Know about Me.”  Now you know!

Karen Tercho

  1. I grew up in Massachusetts and have lived in Montreal (B.A. in cultural anthropology from McGill), Rhode Island (MLIS), and Brooklyn (life lessons). Since then I have sworn off cold winters. Viva California!
  2. I have big interest in the social sciences, especially ethnic and cultural studies, and I enjoy learning about technology, science, history, and baseball.
  3. In my free time I practice and teach yoga and am studying to become a certified Iyengar yoga teacher.
  4. I play the drums and used to play in bands. Being in a band means being in a relationship with multiple creative people, so I’m currently on hiatus.
  5. My travel bug:  India and Italy are my favorites so far, and the U.K. and Cambodia are next on my list.

LRC Third Floor Exhibit – The Art of Ming G. Fong and Sandy Fong Whetstone, Showcasing Through August 9

After witnessing the works of the talented father-daughter duo first-hand, it becomes apparent how Ming Fong and Sandy Fong Whetstone’s work truly tells a story all on its own. There is significance to each of their work, a story that is attempting to be told through the ages, and a viewpoint of these two that is reaching out to be shared with the rest of the world, one that only they can perceive.

One of the Many Pieces of Art by Ming FongMing Fong received training in Chinese Classics in China during the 1930’s, and the inspirations from Chinese cultural influences are clearly seen in his work. Calligraphy remains an essential part of his work, written (and translated in English for the exhibit) as a form of poetry, perfectly complementing the natural appeal of the people and elements of nature that helped shape the type of work Ming would eventually paint together. It’s no wonder why someone as talented as Ming would eventually become the primary source of inspiration for his own daughter’s work during her childhood, and even through to her adult years.

Departing from her father’s more classically-inspired works, Sandy Fong Whetstone takes an approach to art and a view on life that strikes you as uplifting and charming, with a childlike lens on the world. Though Sandy and her father both draw inspiration from nature, Sandy takes traditional ideas of animals and fruits and vegetation, and turns them on their heads. You can see the near life-size ceramic works of art of animals dressed in button-ups and personified with human clothing and characteristics, and eyes that are so accurately modeled, they could easily be mistaken for the real thing. And her interpretations of bipedal fruits and vegetables are so full of joy, you can’t help but want to view this exhibit before it has a chance to run away from you.

Stephen Passey