Anthropology

Anthropology (ANTH) Courses

ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. The topics to be covered will include: the field of anthropology; the scientific method; genetics and inheritance; natural selection; principles and mechanics of evolution; evidence of evolution; modern human variation; living primates; and the fossil evidence for human evolution.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the scope of anthropology and discuss the role of biological anthropology within the discipline.
  • examine the basic concepts of evolution.
  • identify the main contributors to the development of evolutionary theory.
  • summarize methods used in interpreting the fossil record, including dating techniques.
  • describe the classification, morphology, and behavior of living primates.
  • recognize the major groups of hominin fossils and describe alternate phylogenies for human evolution.
  • explain the current hypotheses relevant to an understanding of human evolution.
  • identify the biological and cultural factors responsible for human variation.
  • describe the scientific process as a methodology for understanding the natural world.
  • analyze the evidence to support evolution.
  • explain the basic principles of Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics.
  • evaluate how the forces of evolution produce genetic and phenotypic change over time.

ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ANTH 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better or concurrent enrollment in ANTH 300 or 480.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5B
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 115L
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This introductory laboratory course is designed to familiarize students with the methods and materials of biological anthropology. Topics of significance covered in the course will include human osteology, forensic anthropology, genetics and evolutionary theory, biological classification, primatology, and the fossil evidence for the evolution of humans and their ancestors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify bones and features of the human skeleton and apply that knowledge to distinguish position, articulation, and side of the body for specific bones.
  • recognize sex-related and age-related variation present in human populations, the methods used to describe and measure this variation, and the application of such knowledge to Forensic anthropology.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of molecular and Mendelian genetics; identify sources of biological variation and the inheritance of that variation; apply that knowledge to solve genetics problems; identify the outcomes of evolutionary processes.
  • describe the of principles of biological classification and taxonomy, and apply those principles to classification of the Order Primates.
  • compare and contrast skeletons of strepsirhines, monkeys, apes, and humans, looking especially at locomotor and dietary adaptations; recognize characteristics of living primates that are useful for identification and interpretation of primate fossils.
  • identify and date significant fossils of human ancestors; use specific characteristics to differentiate between fossil species.
  • identify skeletal features associated with bipedalism.
  • discuss biological and behavioral adaptations of the genus Homo and how they contributed to our species.

ANTH 303 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

  • Same As:ADMJ 332
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ANTH 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an overview of forensic anthropology, an applied field of physical anthropology. Forensic anthropology uses the analysis of human skeletal remains to answer medico-legal questions. This course emphasizes current techniques used in analysis of human skeletal remains, medico-legal procedures, and the role of the anthropologist in the investigative process. It examines the basics of bone biology, methods of skeletal analysis, and recognition of bone pathology and trauma. Students may earn credit for either ANTH 303 or ADMJ 332 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the methods and approaches of a forensic anthropologist.
  • apply the techniques for determining sex, age, and ethnicity from human skeletal remains.
  • examine a human skeleton and infer possible trauma and pathology.
  • discuss the legal and ethical issues of working with human remains.
  • apply the processes for establishing positive identification using human remains.
  • explain the role of the forensic anthropologist in a criminal investigation.
  • describe the dynamics of dental anthropology in positive identification.
  • evaluate the significance of human skeletal remains to overall crime scene investigation.

ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the variety of customs, traditions, and forms of social organization in societies around the world. The main goal of the course is to understand the importance of culture for both the individual and societies. Anthropological concepts that will be stressed include human culture and language, cultural relativism, holism, ethnocentrism, cross-cultural comparisons, field work, and theory. Topics include the nature of culture, subsistence methods, religion, linguistics, trade and economic systems, arts, kinship, marriage and family systems, technology, and change.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the complexity of other societies and assess the relevance of cultural diversity in the U.S.
  • question ethnocentric behaviors.
  • analyze cultural similarities and differences through anthropological theories.
  • describe the methods used in ethnographic fieldwork.
  • appraise the role of language in learning, enculturation and cross-cultural communication.
  • evaluate the relevance of kinship, subsistence techniques, social stratification, domestic groups, political organization, the arts, religion, and culture change in the lives of individuals and the functioning of societies.

ANTH 315 Cultures in Focus

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 50 and ENGWR 59 or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course, students will examine a variety of cultures with a focal emphasis on development problems. The historical and cultural context of development will be examined. The technological changes are examined as they impact ideological aspects of culture. Problems of overpopulation, underemployment, and famine will be studied.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the difference between natural culture change and culture change as imposed from external forces.
  • analyze and compare European, Asian, African, American, and Oceanic cultures.
  • critically analyze the process of globalization and its widespread effects.
  • analyze historical and contemporary ethnographic studies to develop concepts of social and economic development and culture change.

ANTH 317 Cultures of Southeast Asia

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 100 or ESLW340 with a grade of “C” or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to and comparison of the many cultures of Southeast Asia, including those in the countries of Vietnam, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Cultural themes will include prehistory, gender, religion, the arts, cuisines, economies, social organization, colonialism, conflict, development, and migration. The course will include studies of Southeast Asian communities in the United States, the historical precedents of their arrivals, and some of the challenges that they face as minority cultures.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the many cultures of Southeast Asia.
  • evaluate the prehistoric and historic factors that have helped to shape the region.
  • describe the contemporary cultures of the region.
  • critique relations between politically dominant state-level societies in Southeast Asia and minority cultures within those states.
  • analyze the causes of Southeast Asian immigration and refuge in the United States and some of the concerns of these populations.

ANTH 320 Introduction to Archaeology and World Prehistory

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the field of Archaeology and a survey of World Prehistory. Students will be introduced to the theories, concepts, and methods employed by archaeologists in the study of the human past. By examining the archaeological record of cultures in Africa, Europe, Asia, the Americas, and the Pacific Islands, students will explore the trajectory of human cultures from the Upper Paleolithic onward, using a range of case studies from around the world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the methods and practice of Archaeology.
  • apply archaeological theories and concepts to the investigation of prehistoric cultures; understand the complexities of interpreting the material record.
  • identify and analyze major cultural events in human history, including dispersal to Australia and the Americas, domestication of plants and animals, rise of social inequality, development of political institutions, and technological advances.
  • identify significant prehistoric cultures around the world and how they illuminate our understanding of human variation and patterns of cultural development.

ANTH 323 Introduction to Archaeology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the concepts, methods, and theoretical perspectives employed in the scientific study of archaeology. Emphasis will be placed on how data is retrieved from the archaeological record and how it can be used to address questions about the development and evolution of human social systems. Topics will include archaeological theory, survey and excavation methods, laboratory analysis, reconstructing past environments, and drawing conclusions about the past from archaeological data. This course will draw upon examples from the New World as well as archaeological examples worldwide. A field trip may be required. Research assignments will be assigned to students who cannot participate in a field trip.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss archaeological theories and methods used to investigate archaeological sites.
  • identify the appropriate dating technique to use on different archaeological materials.
  • critique the different theoretical approaches in archaeological investigations.
  • utilize appropriate mapping, excavation, and artifact collection techniques.
  • recognize the ethical dilemmas that archaeologists face and understand the archaeological code of ethical conduct.
  • interpret archaeological data to form conclusions about the past.
  • apply appropriate inquiry methods to reconstruct past landscapes and social systems.
  • evaluate the effectiveness of different theoretical approaches at evaluating archaeological data.
  • analyze and describe how archaeological knowledge can be applied to the study of modern humans and our societies.

ANTH 324 World Prehistory

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:UC (Effective Summer 2020-2021)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D (effective Fall 2020); IGETC Area 4 (effective Fall 2020)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an archaeological survey of World Prehistory from the emergence of human culture through the development of early civilizations. By examining the archaeological record of cultures in Africa, Europe, Asia, the Americas, and the Pacific Islands, students will explore the trajectory of human cultures through several key developments including early ice age adaptations, origins of agriculture, establishment of permanent settlements, the rise of complex social organization, and specialized technologies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and analyze major cultural events in human history, including dispersal to Australia and the Americas, domestication of plants and animals, rise of social inequality, development of political institutions, and technological advances.
  • identify the variation of human material culture around the world and understand how the archaeological record is reflective of past human beliefs and practices.
  • identify significant prehistoric cultures around the world and how they illuminate our understanding of human variation and patterns of cultural development.

ANTH 325 Archaeology of Mesoamerica

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (effective Summer 2020)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D (effective Fall 2020); IGETC Area 4 (effective Fall 2020)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a survey of the anthropology and archaeology of Mesoamerica. It includes an anthropological perspective of the characteristics of past and present Mesoamerican cultures, including languages, writing systems, mythological and religious traditions, social and political organization, gender roles, economic systems, agriculture and astronomy. The course reviews history from the pre-Columbian period through colonization and the current era, including contemporary ethnography and issues of representation.
Students who took this course as ANTH 499 are not eligible to take this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish the geographic, cultural, and political boundaries of Mesoamerica.
  • investigate the pre-Columbian cultures of Mesoamerica from an anthropological perspective.
  • incorporate an in-depth understanding of the archaeology of Ancient Maya civilization, which will include current knowledge of Maya hieroglyphic writing, Mayan languages, and social organization.
  • analyze the development of agriculture, social stratification, and political economy in Mesoamerica.
  • explain the shared mythological and religious traditions in Mesoamerica.
  • compare the value and limitations of archaeology, epigraphy, art history, ethnohistory, and cultural anthropology in providing knowledge about ancient Mesoamerica and how Mesoamerican peoples and cultures are represented.
  • assess the ethnographic record and attempt to understand emic perspectives and the multiple ways in which Mesoamerican peoples have perceived the world around them.
  • evaluate the significant cultural and historical processes from the Colonial period through the Modern era and the continuities of Mesoamerican cultures through time.

ANTH 331 The Anthropology of Religion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU (formerly ANTH 330); UC (formerly ANTH 330)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys the forms and functions of supernatural belief systems and their associated rituals in various societies. Ethnographic examples are utilized in order to study beliefs and rituals within their sociocultural contexts. Comparisons are then drawn in order to understand the functions of religious and magical beliefs and rituals in human life.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare a large range of religious, ritual, and magical beliefs throughout the world and over time.
  • analyze the sociocultural contexts of religious and magical beliefs.
  • differentiate between the basic anthropological approaches to the study of ritual, magic, and religion, and examine the differences between magical thinking and the scientific method.
  • describe anthropological approaches to data gathering and the analysis of ceremonial, magical, and supernatural practices and beliefs.
  • evaluate the roles of magic, ritual, and belief systems in past and present societies, with comparative emphasis on the students' own cultures.
  • examine examples of new religious movements, their origins, their most important features, and their sociocultural significance.
  • compare supernatural beliefs and practices regarding illness and healing.
  • demonstrate the connections between economics, social organization, and supernatural belief systems cross-culturally.

ANTH 332 Native Peoples of California

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides a study of the Native inhabitants of California from the prehistoric period to the present time, in addition to offering an introduction to the diversity and complexity of aboriginal California. It includes the environmental adaptation, material culture, social structure, ideology, and response to change. This course meets the SCC Multicultural Graduation Requirement for comparative examination of diverse culture groups in the U.S. In addition to gaining perspectives on the great diversity of aboriginal cultures in California, the student will examine the impact of the other Native and non-Native groups on those cultures.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the unique, major culture areas of Native California, the environment of each, the ecological adaptations, and the major cultural features that distinguish those areas.
  • compare and contrast Native California social and cultural systems with at least one other major Native North American cultural area.
  • describe the linguistic diversity and complexity of Native California.
  • demonstrate an awareness of the archaeological record of Native Peoples of California.
  • compare and contrast Native Californian and Western European systems of categorization.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the history and methods of anthropological study of California Native Peoples.
  • hypothesize on the positive and negative values, such as ethnocentrism and cultural integrity, of the relationship of Native Californians to Spanish, Mexican, and American immigrants based on archaeological, folkloric (first person accounts from the original culture), and historical evidence.
  • analyze and speculate from an anthropological perspective on the continuities and current issues among Native Californians within and across tribal groups.
  • use applied anthropological techniques, examine and analyze a source of present day culture conflicts between native peoples and the dominant Euro-American culture and recommend alternative solutions.

ANTH 334 Native Peoples of North America

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introductory survey of traditional Native American societies. In this course students will gain an understanding of the peoples and cultures of North America and evaluate native ecological adaptations, languages, social organizations, religion, mythologies and world view, and artistic representations. Perspectives on changes in traditional life and Native Americans' current social roles and statuses will be included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the unique, major culture areas of North America, the environments of each, native ecological adaptations, and major cultural features that distinguish those areas.
  • contrast social or cultural systems within Native North America and between Native American and the Euro-American system.
  • describe the linguistic diversity and complexity of Native North America.
  • demonstrate an awareness of the archaeological record of Native Peoples of North America.
  • compare and contrast Native and Western systems of categorization.
  • demonstrate an awareness of the history and methods of anthropological study of North American Native Peoples.
  • demonstrate an awareness of the continuities and current issues among Native Peoples of North America.

ANTH 341 Introduction to Linguistics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course will involve the student in the exploration of language from an anthropological perspective, including the biological basis of language, the role of language in social interaction and world view, minority languages and dialects, bilingualism, literacy, the social motivation of language change, and the impact of language loss. The student will also be introduced to the analytical techniques of linguistics and the demonstration of their relevance to language in sociocultural issues.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the biological basis of language, including genetic, physiological, and neurological aspects of language, and the biocultural origins of language.
  • apply linguistic theory and methods to a social interpretation of languages and their relation to culture.
  • interpret and describe language using structural linguistic techniques.
  • describe and demonstrate how paralanguage alters and enhances social communication in humans and non-human primates.
  • describe the role of language as a reflection of culture and ways in which language influences thought.
  • examine minority languages and dialects, bilingualism, literacy, the social motivation of language change, and the impact of language loss.
  • recognize the interrelated acquisition of language and culture.
  • examine cross-cultural non-verbal communication.
  • apply the methodologies of historical linguistics and language comparisons, describing the process of linguistic divergence and the creation of new languages or dialects.
  • demonstrate an awareness of how race, class, gender, ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation intersect with language use.

ANTH 480 Honors Biological Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for admission to the Honors Program
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a seminar-style honors-level introduction to the science of biological anthropology. Topics will include: the field of anthropology; the scientific method; genetics and inheritance; natural selection; principles and mechanics of evolution; evidence of evolution; modern human variation; living primates; and the fossil evidence for human evolution. Honors courses are open to students who demonstrate an ability to write carefully reasoned, well-organized essays of varying lengths, are prepared to make clear oral presentations in class, and are able to actively contribute to seminar discussions. Credit may be earned for ANTH 480 or ANTH 300 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the nature and origins of the science of biological anthropology.
  • describe the scientific method and discuss how it serves as a methodology for understanding the natural world.
  • discuss the evidence that supports the theory of evolution and evaluate how the forces of evolution produce genetic and phenotypic change over time.
  • explain the basic principles of Mendelian, molecular and population genetics, and how they affect biological change.
  • describe the classification, morphology, and behavior of living primates, and the nature of our relationship to non-human primates.
  • recognize the major groups of hominin fossils and identify the biological and cultural adaptations of human ancestors.
  • summarize methods used in interpreting the fossil record, including dating techniques.
  • identify the biological and cultural factors responsible for human variation.

ANTH 481 Honors Cultural Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for admission to the Honors Program.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a seminar-style introduction to the variety of customs, traditions, and forms of social organization in a variety of western and non-western societies. The main goal of the course is to understand the importance of culture for both the individual and societies. Anthropological concepts will be emphasized including human culture and language, cultural relativism, holism, ethnocentrism, cross-cultural comparisons, fieldwork, and theory. Topics include the nature of culture, subsistence methods, religion, linguistics, trade and economic systems, arts, kinship, marriage and family systems, technology, and change. This honors section uses an intensive instructional methodology designed to challenge motivated students.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze cultural similarities and differences through anthropological theories.
  • assess the relevance of cultural diversity in the U.S.
  • identify ethnocentrism and understand the shortcomings of this viewpoint.
  • explore cultural beliefs/behaviors through both emic and etic perspectives.
  • describe the methods used in ethnographic fieldwork; analyze and evaluate the ethical issues anthropologists encounter.
  • discuss the role of language in shaping worldview, learning, enculturation, and cross-cultural communication.
  • evaluate the relevance of kinship and marriage patterns, subsistence techniques, social stratification, domestic groups, political organization, the arts, religion, and culture change in the lives of individuals and the functioning of societies.
  • explain the interconnectedness of the economic, political, and sociocultural forces of globalization amongst diverse cultural groups.

ANTH 495 Independent Studies in Anthropology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides an opportunity to take a course in anthropology that covers topics that are not part of the regular curriculum. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the anthropological concepts studied in this course.
  • demonstrate competence in the anthropological skills studied in this course.

ANTH 499 Experimental Offering in Anthropology

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020