Business

Business (BUS) Courses

BUS 100 English for the Professional

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 and ENGRD 110, or ESLW 320 and ESLR 320 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to prepare students to be effective communicators in business and in workplace environments. In addition to correct usage of the English language, students learn effective business writing principles, i.e., brevity and succinctness. Included are skills and techniques of written communication, sentence structure, word usage, punctuation, spelling, business vocabulary, and business document formatting. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and effective writing techniques through analyzing written communication and composing and organizing paragraphs into effective business documents. Computer skills are utilized throughout the course to format business documents and search the Internet for information and resources. Proofreading skills are also emphasized. This course focuses on teaching students to analyze, compose, and organize written communication into effective business documents. BUS 100 is required by several certificate and degree programs within the Business Division and is recommended for all business majors. It is also a prerequisite to BUS 310 - Business Communications.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, select, and use appropriate writing aids and references.
  • prepare business documents that demonstrate knowledge and correct application of English grammar, word usage, spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure.
  • analyze and evaluate business documents for tone, voice, and communication effectiveness, e.g., sentence length and complexity.
  • produce business documents that reflect critical thinking, effective writing, and business vocabulary.
  • write coherent, well-developed, unified paragraphs.
  • examine the content of and proofread written business documents.
  • create, revise, and edit sentences, paragraphs, and basic business documents using a computer.
  • locate and evaluate relevant information using the Internet and internet resources.

BUS 105 Business Mathematics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ESLR 320 or ENGRD 10, and MATH 27 OR MATH 28 with grades of "C" or better; OR placement through assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a review of basic mathematical skills and introduces equations and formulas in solving for unknowns. Applications of mathematics in business include such areas as banking, commercial discounts, retail and wholesale markup-markdown, payroll computations, simple and compound interest, bank discount, present value, inventory valuation, depreciation, and financial statements. This course is recommended for many majors in business.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to add, subtract, multiply, and divide.
  • demonstrate the ability to analyze and solve application problems.
  • solve for unknowns by using formulas, variables, and equations.
  • demonstrate accuracy, neatness, thoroughness, promptness, and speed in solving and composing responses to mathematical problems.
  • evaluate financial alternatives based on mathematical formulas.

BUS 107 Keyboarding

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides individualized, self-paced instruction of keyboarding skills. It is designed to help students learn to touch type and use the numeric keypad, while building speed and accuracy. Students may work independently in the computer lab during open lab hours and are awarded units based on successful completion of course learning outcomes. The first unit of credit is earned when the student demonstrates the ability to touch-type at least 33 words per minute, with no more than 5 errors. The second unit of credit is earned when the student demonstrates the ability to touch-type at least 38 words per minute, with no more than 5 errors. The third unit of credit is earned when the student demonstrates operation of a numeric keypad by touch at a rate of 8,000 or more keystrokes per hour with 98 percent accuracy. Students may enroll in this open-entry/open-exit course up to the eighth week of the semester and as space allows. This course is graded on a Pass/No Pass basis and may be taken for a maximum of three units.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define keyboarding terminology.
  • identify and correct keyboard errors quickly and accurately.
  • type at least 33 words per minute with no more than 5 errors. (first unit)
  • type at least 38 words per minute with no more than 5 errors. (second unit)
  • demonstrate operation of a numeric keypad by touch at a rate of 8,000 or more keystrokes per hour with a 98% accuracy. (third unit)

BUS 260 Communicating With Customers

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces key elements of communication and its importance in providing exceptional customer service. Topics include verbal and nonverbal communication as well as listening skills. Emphasis is placed on how to effectively and constructively communicate with internal and external customers. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the communication process within a customer service context.
  • distinguish among the various obstacles that get in the way of successful communication.
  • experiment with various useful listening techniques.
  • analyze the effectiveness of specific communications techniques.
  • apply techniques that result in constructive communications with internal and external customers.

BUS 261 Exceptional Customer Service

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides preparation for a broad range of customer service environments. Key skills and attitudes necessary to provide exceptional customer service are developed in this course. Concepts such as internal and external customers, customer satisfaction, and customer retention are explored. Topics also include communicating with customers, developing a positive attitude, handling complaints, and sales skills. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply positive communication and listening techniques.
  • practice the key elements of exceptional customer service including reliability, assurance, tangibles, empathy, and responsiveness.
  • evaluate and respond appropriately to customer expectations.
  • select techniques to handle customer complaints in a positive way.
  • differentiate between the key elements of customer satisfaction and customer retention.

BUS 262 Team Building in the Workplace

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course explores team building and the role teams play in providing exceptional customer service. Topics include how effective teams work, common problems teams encounter, and methods for resolving issues between team members. Students will learn to recognize and deal with various coworker personalities and team player styles. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain why teamwork is important in the workplace.
  • define the characteristics of an effective team.
  • apply team building techniques.
  • analyze the role of personalities in the workplace.
  • assess various team player styles.
  • evaluate common team problems and employ methods to solve them.

BUS 263 Attitude in the Workplace

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to introduce the subject of attitude and the importance of a positive attitude in providing exceptional customer service. Participants will develop key skills to maintain a positive attitude in the workplace. Concepts include how attitudes are communicated and how to adjust one’s own attitude. Topics will also include the primary causes of a bad attitude and specific techniques to improve the attitudes of others. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the importance of maintaining a positive attitude in the workplace.
  • evaluate how attitudes are communicated in order to project the best possible attitude.
  • distinguish the three types of attitudes and evaluate how each might affect the workplace.
  • explain and practice key skills in attitude adjustment.
  • discuss the primary causes of a bad attitude and apply turnaround strategies to battle them.

BUS 264 Ethics and Values in the Workplace

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course emphasizes the importance of ethics and values in delivering exceptional customer service. Students will learn how to evaluate ethical behavior, how to determine what influences our values, and how values influence actions. Emphasis is placed on developing a personal ethical philosophy and helping others do the right thing. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain values, where values come from, and how values influence our actions.
  • describe her or his own values and understand how those values affect her or his work.
  • evaluate his or her own ethical behavior.
  • analyze why people participate in unethical behavior.
  • assess how consistent his or her values are with his or her organization.

BUS 265 Stress Management in the Workplace

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course explores the elements of stress management and its importance in providing exceptional customer service. Topics include the recognition of stress, causes of stress, and the benefits of managing stress. Emphasis is placed on a multitude of ways to handle stress in order to have a more productive professional and personal life. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe stress and the organizational and personal costs associated with stress.
  • identify stressors, both internal and external.
  • examine his or her own stress condition.
  • compare the various stress management techniques.
  • choose stress management techniques that are best suited for himself or herself.

BUS 266 Time Management in the Workplace

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces the principles of time management and the importance of managing time efficiently in providing exceptional customer service. Specific tools that assist in making the maximum use of one's time are discussed. Emphasis is placed on how to prioritize, identifying time wasters, delegation, and goal setting. Basic concepts of managing space will also be covered. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the value of good time management skills.
  • prepare and evaluate a self-diagnosis to determine where his or her time goes.
  • distinguish among common time wasters and formulate plans to eliminate them.
  • discuss the importance of setting goals and priorities to help minimize procrastination.
  • apply the principles of effective delegation.
  • practice various techniques for managing a work space.

BUS 267 Dealing With Conflict in the Workplace

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces the subject of conflict management and the importance of managing conflict in providing exceptional customer service. Topics include the meaning of conflict, the causes of conflict between individuals and groups within an organization, and strategies for resolving interpersonal conflict. Emphasis is placed on how to deal with difficult people in customer service situations and how to bring out the best in others. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the different conflict styles and interpret his or her own style.
  • recognize the causes of conflict.
  • design strategies for resolving interpersonal conflict.
  • demonstrate how to use various techniques for resolving conflict in the workplace.
  • formulate plans to win over difficult customers.

BUS 268 Decision Making & Problem Solving in the Workplace

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces the role and importance of effective decision making and problem solving in providing exceptional customer service. Emphasis is placed on recognized techniques for solving problems, common traps to avoid when making decisions, and tools for generating creative solutions. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the differences between decision making and problem solving.
  • identify several traps that interfere with effective decision making.
  • recognize blocks to effective problem solving.
  • apply common problem-solving techniques.
  • discuss the importance of creativity in problem solving.
  • employ methods to stimulate creativity.

BUS 269 Organizational Change

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course explores organizational change and the role it plays in providing exceptional customer service. Topics will include understanding organizational change, theoretical models of change, stages of change, and how to survive and thrive when an organization changes. Skills and strategies for becoming a change agent in your organization will be discussed. The goal is to provide practical, hands-on skills to non-management level personnel.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the stages of change and assess how to effectively deal with each stage.
  • evaluate the symptoms of resistance to change and formulate strategies to effectively deal with that resistance.
  • formulate a plan for communicating change within an organization.
  • analyze examples of organizational change and consider how effectively they were handled.
  • design a strategy for surviving change in his or her personal or professional life.

BUS 300 Introduction to Business

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 50 with a grade "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID BUS 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Introduction to Business is a survey business course providing a multidisciplinary examination of how culture, society, human behavior, and economic systems interact with legal, international, political, and financial institutions to affect business policy and practices within the U.S. and the global marketplace. Students will evaluate how these influences impact the primary areas of business including: organizational structure and design; leadership, human resource management, and organized labor practices; marketing; organizational communication; technology; entrepreneurship; legal, accounting, and financial practices; the stock and securities markets; and, therefore, affect a business’ ability to achieve its organizational goals.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess the relationships and interdependencies of economic, social, legal, and global environments in which businesses operate.
  • examine the major functional areas of business including management, human relations, marketing, finance, accounting, and international business.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the vocabulary of business.
  • apply business skills to succeed in the world of business.

BUS 310 Business Communications

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:BUS 100, ENGWR 101 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a)
  • C-ID:C-ID BUS 115
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course applies the theory and principles of ethical and effective written and oral communication to the creation of letters, memos, emails, and written and oral reports for a variety of business situations. The course emphasizes planning, organizing, composing, and revising business documents and creating and delivering professional-level reports using word processing and presentation software.

Analytical skills are used to plan, organize, compose, critique, and revise letters, memos, emails, and reports. Message components, which include organization, content, style, tone, grammar, format, and appearance, are critically analyzed. A formal analytical research paper is created and its results are presented. This course is designed for students who already have college-level writing skills.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze how word selection and word usage affect the efficiency and effectiveness of communication.
  • solve business communication problems through planning, problem solving, organizing, writing, listening, and presenting skills and techniques.
  • identify and eliminate gender, age, racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic bias in communication, thereby demonstrating awareness of and sensitivity to multicultural and diverse audiences and situations.
  • plan, write, assess, and revise letters, memorandums, emails, and reports suitable for a variety of business situations, including quantitative and business legal contexts.
  • discern the differences between primary and secondary research.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the importance of original written work and the role of proper citations and references, avoiding plagiarism of either a deliberate or inadvertent nature.
  • compose an analytical formal keyed research report based on research findings using APA style.
  • present the findings of a formal analytical research paper using presentation software.
  • integrate visuals, e.g., graphics, tables, charts, and illustrations into a formal research paper and oral presentation.

BUS 320 Concepts in Personal Finance

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:BUS 105 or MATH 28 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 50 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area B4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers how to analyze financial affairs for lifelong personal financial management. It examines the basics of financial planning, analysis, and decision making in areas of goal setting, budgeting, taxes, credit, money management, insurance, investments, and retirement with an emphasis on principles to develop economic decision-making skills.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze economic principles and concepts and apply these principles to individual financial planning.
  • establish personal financial goals and design a personal financial plan to achieve them.
  • explain types of risk and risk management methods and develop a risk management plan.
  • calculate the cost of credit, assess types and sources of credit, and develop an appropriate credit card and debt plan.
  • research, evaluate, and analyze corporate financial information to make investment decisions.
  • explain the parts of a corporate balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement.
  • create an appropriate long-term investment plan for their stage in life.
  • explain and apply basic mathematical concepts related to personal finance and solve problems through quantitative reasoning.

BUS 325 Investments and Financial Management

  • Same As:ECON 330
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:BUS 320, ECON 302, ECON 304, or MATH 120 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Fundamentals of Investment Management and Financial Markets will provide important information that individuals should know before investing their funds or managing investments. The course will be equally valuable to those who have little or no knowledge of investing and financial markets as well as those who are already investors and want to sharpen their skills. The course will provide a blend of the traditional and modern approaches to investment decision making (and financial markets). The traditional approach is largely descriptive, while the modern approach emphasizes quantitative techniques. Credit may be awarded for ECON 330 or BUS 325, but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate understanding of investment objectives, economic needs, and financial goals and design financial models to achieve them.
  • analyze the changing economic and financial environment and formulate strategies to attempt to adapt to this evolution.
  • apply economic principles, concepts, and theories to individual economic and investment planning.
  • demonstrate understanding of the conceptual basis of various economic tools and models (and the terminology) available to the individual to deal with decision-making in financial markets.
  • develop a theory of money, interest rate determination, and the term structure of interest rates.

BUS 330 Managing Diversity in the Workplace

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The course examines the leadership skills and abilities needed to manage a multicultural workforce. A primary focus is placed upon the workplace impact of various historical, social, and cultural experiences and perspectives related to gender, age, race, ethnicity, and disability. Workforce issues related to the diversity of the American consumer and global consumer impact on the United States are analyzed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define culture within the context of the United States workplace.
  • analyze demographic trends in order to determine possible future directions in the United States workforce.
  • analyze how language, gender, race, ethnicity, and organizational culture interact to produce an organizational climate.
  • demonstrate leadership, negotiation, and communication skills that are effective in managing a multicultural workforce.
  • analyze the impact of cultural, historical, and stereotypical perspectives on the workplace.
  • examine ethnicity and the concept of ethnocentrism as it applies to a workplace culture and compare the experiences of various underrepresented minority groups in the workplace in the United States.
  • promote workplace equity by developing strategies to identity and remove barriers that are based on race, ethnicity, age, gender, religion, ability, sexual orientation, and gender identity.
  • examine civil rights legislation in the United States and California and critique the impact on the American workplace.

BUS 340 Business Law

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID BUS 125
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces the fundamental legal principles pertaining to business transactions. Topics covered include the legal process, dispute resolution, and federal and state court systems, including a comprehensive study of contracts under the common law and the Uniform Commercial Code. The course emphasizes business ethics, corporate social responsibility, tort law, constitutional law, agency, business crimes, sales transactions, legal structures of business, and criminal law as applied in a business setting.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • appraise the relationship between law and ethics.
  • explain the social, political, and ethical implications of the law and their application to actual and hypothetical business transactions, as well as operation of the court system and sources of commercial law.
  • analyze cases to identify issues and apply the appropriate legal rules to the fact patterns.
  • explain a corporation's legal structure, differentiate it from other forms of business organization, and explain the meaning of limited liability.
  • distinguish between torts and crimes and describe the purpose of criminal and tort law.
  • evaluate when a promise is enforceable, the elements of a contract, performance, and the remedies available in the event of a breach.
  • distinguish between contracts governed by the Uniform Commercial Code and those governed by the common law of contracts.
  • describe the relationship between state and federal systems, jurisdiction, and the importance of alternate dispute resolution methods.
  • describe the various agency relationships and the duties and liabilities of agents and principals.
  • describe the Constitutional basis for federal government regulation of business, including limits of government power.

BUS 345 Law and Society

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4G
  • C-ID:C-ID BUS 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course benefits students in every major by making all students aware of their rights and obligations under the law. They will be introduced to the American common law system, with emphasis on the practical aspects, the theory behind the law, and the law as a reflection of society. Areas studied include the U.S. Constitution, the Court and legal systems, law of Crimes, Torts, Contracts, Landlord-Tenant Relationships, Employment, and Family Law. This course is not to be taken in place of BUS 340, Business Law, where required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the origins and development of the U.S. legal system.
  • recognize the organization of our courts and its procedures.
  • demonstrate the importance of law as a legitimate instrument of social change.
  • demonstrate an understanding of critical thinking skills and analysis techniques.
  • analyze cases and identify issues and apply the appropriate legal rules to the fact patterns to reach defensible legal conclusions.
  • think logically, critically review information, and separate fact from opinion.
  • assess competing legal arguments on important societal issues.
  • appraise the relationship between law and ethics.
  • distinguish between torts and crimes and describe the purpose of criminal and tort law.
  • enumerate various major legal theories for societal problem solving.
  • explain a corporation’s legal structure and differentiate it from other forms of business organization, understand the meaning of limited liability for the owners; describe the relationship of the various stakeholders in the corporation.
  • differentiate the major differences between the U.S.'s adversarial legal system versus the inquisitorial system of justice found in many other countries.
  • demonstrate an understanding of contracts, classification, contract terms and elements, performance, enforcement, breach, and remedies.

BUS 495 Independent Studies in Business

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:27 - 216 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

An independent studies project involves an individual student or a small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the regularly offered accounting courses. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • design and discuss a proposal of study with a supervising business instructor.
  • demonstrate the ability to independently pursue a course of study or project in business.
  • prepare a final report or project incorporating results of study or activities.

BUS 498 Work Experience in Business

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be currently employed or participating in an internship to receive credit for this course.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to provide students with effective job development skills that will assist them in obtaining and keeping an internship or a job in the student's major area. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; the responsibilities of an internship (where applicable) or a job; completion of Title V Education Code papers (the student's Application, Learning Objectives, Time sheet, and Evaluations), which document the student's progress and hours spent at the workplace or internship site; and developing workplace (soft) skills relevant to the 21st century workplace. In addition, the student is required to fulfill 18 hours lecture and 75 hours of related, paid work experience or 60 hours of volunteer work experience for one unit; 75 or 60 hours of related work experience for each additional unit. The program allows the student to combine practical, paid or non-paid work experience with college training. The course may be taken up to four times when there is new or expanded learning on the job for up to 16 units. In addition, the student and the Work Experience instructor may tailor the course to meet the student's specific professional needs by identifying 1-4 workshops, trainings, or conferences that the student may attend as part of the curriculum of the Business 498 class. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Business includes Accounting, Business, Computer Information Science, Management, Marketing, and Real Estate. The class will explore the use of modern personnel management principles such as employee appraisal, interviewing, and self-motivation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply classroom study through application of planned, supervised on-the-job experience.
  • develop practical workplace (soft) skills, acquire knowledge, and build confidence in the workplace.
  • evaluate himself/herself in the Career/Life Planning Process: Self-Awareness; Career Awareness; Decision Making and Goal Setting; Job Search and Workplace Success; Balanced Lifestyle.

BUS 499 Experimental Offering in Business

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


Entrepreneurship (ENTR) Courses

ENTR 299 Experimental Offering in Entrepreneurship

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


ENTR 301 Accounting for Entrepreneurs

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces accounting in a start-up organization and evaluates why it is important and how it is used by investors, creditors, and others to make business decisions. The course covers recording and reporting of business transactions with a focus on the financial statements and statement analysis. It includes how entrepreneurs use accounting information in decision-making, planning, and directing operations. The course will focus on performance analysis in start-up settings.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the nature and purpose of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).
  • apply the components of financial accounting and reporting, including qualitative characteristics of accounting information, the assumptions underlying accounting, the basic principles of financial accounting, and the constraints and limitations on accounting information.
  • explain how an accounting system can be designed to satisfy the needs of a startup business and their users.
  • prepare and interpret the purpose of the basic financial statements and the annual report and how they satisfy the information needs of investors, creditors, and other users.
  • identify how the principles of internal control are used to manage and control the firm's resources and minimize risk.
  • assess the hiring needs of a start-up and have the ability to understand and evaluate whether permanent, temporary, or consultants are the best option.
  • understand and evaluate what different funding alternatives are available and what is best for the start-up.

ENTR 350 Introduction to Entrepreneurship, Strategy, and Managing People

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces the foundational concepts of entrepreneurship. Students will explore the feasibility of a small business idea while writing an opportunity analysis, which is the first step toward development of a full business plan. This course also examines legal forms of ownership, development of a strong business strategy, and development of a plan for managing human resources in a small business.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the role of entrepreneurship and small business in the U.S. economy.
  • research and write an opportunity analysis for a business idea.
  • create a vision, mission, core values, and business strategy for an entrepreneurial venture.
  • explain how structure, strategy, and culture develop in a growing business.
  • assess the legal ownership options for small business.
  • prioritize the human resource management needs of a small business.
  • develop a human resource plan for a small business.

ENTR 352 21st Century Skills & Professional Competencies for Entrepreneurs

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to deliver the sought after workplace soft skills and professional competencies. Through curriculum, assessment, and digital badging resources, students will gain knowledge and insights necessary to develop the following workplace soft skills and competencies: adaptability, self-awareness, digital fluency, communication, collaboration, empathy, analysis, resiliency, an entrepreneurial mindset, and social/diversity awareness.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate risks and learn from mistakes in order to improve a product, service, or process.
  • discern changes that have the potential to disrupt industries and workplace norms and expectations, like new technology.
  • use feedback in a positive way, and learn from efforts that go wrong.
  • assess their personality, strengths, and areas of knowledge, skills, and habits.
  • look for work opportunities that would be a compatible match for personal skills and strengths.
  • demonstrate a basic understanding of computer, tablet, and smartphone hardware and software and how they work.
  • speak in a professional, credible manner, using appropriate content and technology tools.
  • work effectively with a diverse team, in person or remotely.
  • set priorities and goals, anticipate possible consequences, and develop contingency plans.
  • examine information and data using critical thinking skills.

ENTR 356 Bootstrap Marketing for Entrepreneurs

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to introduce students to the unique challenges of marketing in start-up organizations and to provide tips and techniques for launching and promoting a new business. Students learn about the evolving practice of marketing and the potential for entrepreneurial thinking. A key component of this course is the development of a complete marketing plan for a new business venture.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify an understanding of the marketing mix in entrepreneurial settings.
  • identify and evaluate entrepreneurial opportunities from emerging trends in marketing.
  • conduct marketing research to develop and launch a new product or service.
  • apply entrepreneurial thinking to market segmentation and target market decisions.
  • develop and present a marketing plan for an entrepreneurial venture.

ENTR 358 Entrepreneurship Capstone

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENTR 350 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:Student may be concurrently enrolled in the above courses.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the various elements in starting and operating a small business. Students will learn about the components necessary to develop a business plan throughout the guided pathway; and from those components, launch, monitor, and adjust plans regarding the progress of a business operation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • build and submit a well-crafted business plan that includes mission statement, company description, external market analysis, and marketing plan.
  • build and submit financial statements that include pro-forma income statement and balance sheet.
  • design a business card.
  • activate a home page for the business website.
  • build and implement a marketing plan that includes a clear description of pricing, promotion and placement strategies.
  • launch a business that will generate sales revenue, and monitor the business’ progress through end of semester.

ENTR 499 Experimental Offering in Entrepreneurship

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


Management (MGMT) Courses

MGMT 295 Independent Studies in Management

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an independent study of a management topic or research project. It is for students who wish to develop an in-depth understanding in fundamental topics of management and to learn to work in a collaborative atmosphere with instructors, and possibly other students. Instructor approval is required to enroll in this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to select a suitable management topic for investigation and assess its relationship to current developments in the discipline of study.
  • demonstrate the ability to define clear research objectives and to select and review secondary sources that are relevant to the research questions in a structured and organized manner.
  • design appropriate primary research projects that address the defined research objective.
  • deduce meaningful conclusions and recommendations from the sources reviewed and research conducted.
  • work collaboratively with an instructor or instructors and possibly other students.

MGMT 299 Experimental Offering in Management

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


MGMT 304 Principles of Management

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101, ESLW 340, or BUS 100 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This basic course in management introduces a variety of modern management concepts including management functions of planning, organization, staffing, leadership, and control. In addition, such concepts as team development, communication, business ethics, and global management perspectives will be discussed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine the five functions of management and apply the planning, organizing, staffing, controlling, and leadership roles in a variety of real life business situations.
  • evaluate the skills required to be an effective manager.
  • explain how internal and external environmental forces influence organizations and how organizations can influence their environments.
  • apply the strategic, tactical, and operational planning process to a variety of modern management situations.
  • assess how organizations improve through the use of effective organizational design.
  • examine how effective human resource and team management leads to competitive advantage.
  • critique and apply the major theories of motivation and leadership.

MGMT 308 Personnel and Human Resources Management

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101, ESLW 340, or BUS 100 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the study and analysis of personnel and human resource management. It explores essential topics such as managing human resources in a global environment, job design, recruitment and retention methods, performance appraisal techniques, training, compensation, labor management relations, and important human resource laws. This course is valuable for students who anticipate a career in human resource management or general management. Case studies from business are used to develop critical management decision-making skills.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the role of human resource management in public and private organizations.
  • identify and apply the various federal and state laws and regulations to the management of human resources.
  • analyze and decide upon the use of personnel recruitment and selection methods for different sets of conditions.
  • compare and contrast various performance appraisal techniques, explaining the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • analyze and appraise the dynamics and legal foundations of labor and management relations.
  • evaluate and apply accepted training methods to various personnel situations.
  • explain how careful and astute management of human resources can result in better job performance.

MGMT 309 Introduction to Supervision

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101, ESLW 340, or BUS 100 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This introductory course in supervision is designed to meet the needs of students interested in learning more about the role of a supervisor. Emphasis is on employee motivation, morale, working conditions, communication with employee groups, conflict management, recruiting and interviewing potential employees, training, group dynamics, and health and safety issues. This course focuses on first line supervisory responsibilities. It is most valuable for students who have been or are in the workplace and who are making or anticipating the transition from employee to supervisor. Case studies from business are used to prepare the student for a supervisory position.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define and assess a supervisor’s role and responsibilities.
  • understand the skills necessary for effective supervision of employees.
  • analyze and evaluate group and individual behaviors as they relate to the workplace.
  • formulate and employ an effective model of communication with superiors and employees.
  • determine, explain, outline, and apply a framework for managing the work performance of employees.
  • review and analyze workplace scenarios to synthesize information, recommend a course of action, and justify the recommended action based on careful analysis of the situation.
  • use a self-assessment to evaluate interest and skills to determine if a career in management is desirable.

MGMT 372 Human Relations and Organizational Behavior

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:BUS 100, ENGWR 101 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course emphasizes the psychology of human relations management. It covers human interaction principles that build confidence, competence, and positive attitudes in work organizations. Topics include the basis for human behavior, perception, personality, communication, stress, time and career management, motivation, performance improvement, group behavior, ethics, and social responsibility.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze theories of human behavior at work.
  • demonstrate effective human interaction skills in the workplace.
  • determine the key ingredients that motivate people.
  • assess intrapersonal and interpersonal skills in effective human interaction, and negotiation.
  • evaluate employee morale and performance in such areas as goal orientation, innovation and creativity, constructive discipline, delegation, and responsibility.

MGMT 495 Independent Studies in Management

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an independent study of a management topic or research project. It is for students who wish to develop an in-depth understanding in fundamental topics of management and to learn to work in a collaborative atmosphere with instructors and other students. Instructor approval is required to enroll in this course. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to select a suitable topic for investigation and to appreciate its relationship with current developments in the respective subject areas.
  • design appropriate primary research projects that address the defined research objectives.
  • deduce meaningful conclusions and recommendations from the sources reviewed and research conducted.

MGMT 499 Experimental Offering in Management

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


Marketing (MKT) Courses

MKT 300 Principles of Marketing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:BUS 100, ENGWR 101, or ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides a general overview of marketing principles. The course covers the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational goals. Elements of the marketing environment such as government regulation, environmental protection, competition, and consumer behavior will be analyzed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize the functions of the marketing mix and apply those functions to marketing information.
  • examine the importance of customer satisfaction and the priorities of the marketing concept.
  • illustrate how marketers segment their markets and design target markets.
  • evaluate how marketers plan and make marketing decisions regarding the controllable factors of the marketing mix and the uncontrollable factors that influence them.
  • develop business relationships both in the consumer and industrial markets.
  • research, analyze, and evaluate several companies and write about various concepts of marketing, such as target marketing, social responsibility, and product mix.

MKT 310 Selling Professionally

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines and presents the qualifications necessary to achieve success in professional selling. Emphasis is placed on the development of a business personality and its application to prospecting, structuring the sales presentation, handling objections, closing, servicing, and customer relationship management. Application of techniques in product and service situations and integration of technology as a sales tool are explored. Different types of selling experiences such as direct, industrial, wholesale, and retail are covered. Students will participate in role-playing exercises and deliver a sales presentation. This course is recommended for all students entering any career in business.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the role of selling in the marketing process.
  • illustrate a professional attitude toward a sales career.
  • demonstrate the qualifications and characteristics for effective selling.
  • analyze differences in techniques in direct, industrial, wholesale, and retail sales.
  • prepare a professional sales presentation.

MKT 312 Retailing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:BUS 100, ENGWR 101, or ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Retailing is a business activity that provides goods and services to customers for their personal use. This course covers modern retail operations with emphasis on consumer behavior, store location, sourcing of goods, pricing, organization, promotion, merchandising, management, and other pertinent factors of retail operations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain how retailers use merchandise management decisions to implement their retail strategy, including planning, buying, pricing, branding, and promoting their merchandise.
  • explain how needs and social factors affect consumer buying decisions and how retailers segment their markets.
  • evaluate specific retail site locations, based upon factors such as trade area, competition, natural and artificial barriers, traffic flow, parking, and leases.
  • illustrate how retailers use customer relationship management (CRM) to identify their best customers and build customer loyalty.
  • examine career opportunities in the field of retailing.

MKT 314 Advertising

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines advertising as a marketing communications tool. Emphasis is placed on consumer behavior, creative methods, media selection, measurements of effectiveness, and coordination with other aspects of the marketing program.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine the major social and economic impacts of advertising in the United States.
  • describe how the advertising industry operates and produces advertising through the work of advertisers, agencies, media, and suppliers.
  • evaluate the various advertising media, including television, radio, magazines, newspapers, outdoor, internet, social media, direct mail, and other media.
  • create and produce advertising examples for magazine ads, television and radio commercials, social media, and billboards.
  • work together in groups to create and present media advertising for an advertising campaign.

MKT 330 Internet Marketing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:CISC 305 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces the use of social media and other internet technologies, with an emphasis on the theory and practice of marketing in an electronic environment. Topics include the personalization and interactivity of the Internet to build strong customer relationships. These concepts are applied to traditional brick and mortar as well as exclusively online businesses.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create effective internet marketing strategies that enhance a business' relationship with present and future customers.
  • identify and evaluate decisions in the selection of internet marketing strategies to make a business more effective.
  • apply complex decision-making techniques to problems involving e-commerce practice and a company's role in this evolving business environment.

MKT 495 Independent Studies in Marketing

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Student must obtain approval from an instructor to conduct an independent study with that instructor or instructors.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an independent study of a marketing topic or research project. It is for students who wish to develop an in-depth understanding in fundamental topics of marketing and to learn to work in a collaborative atmosphere with instructors and other students. Instructor approval is required to enroll in this course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to select a suitable topic for investigation and to appreciate its relationship with current developments in the respective subject areas.
  • demonstrate the ability to define clear research objectives and to select and review secondary sources that are relevant to the research questions in a structured and organized manner.
  • design appropriate primary research projects that address the defined research objectives.
  • deduce meaningful conclusions and recommendations from the sources reviewed and research conducted.
  • work collaboratively with an instructor or instructors and other students.

MKT 498 Work Experience in Marketing

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:According to Education Code Title V regulations, a student cannot earn academic credits in a Work Experience class unless s/he has either a job or an internship.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within their current job. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; completion of required forms, which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site; and developing workplace skills and competencies. During the course of the semester, the student is required to fulfill a 16 hour orientation and 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of unpaid work experience, for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. The course may be taken four times for credit, when there is new or expanded learning on the job, for a maximum of 16 units.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply classroom study through application of planned, supervised on-the-job experience.
  • develop practical workplace (soft) skills, acquire knowledge, and build confidence in the workplace.
  • evaluate himself/herself in the following Career/Life Planning Process: Self-Awareness; Career Awareness; Decision Making & Goal Setting; Job Search & Workplace Success; Balanced Lifestyle.
  • improve his or her potential for promotion in the workplace.
  • develop skills to conduct him/herself in a professional manner in the workplace.

MKT 499 Experimental Offering in Marketing

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


Real Estate (RE) Courses

RE 300 California Real Estate Principles

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This fundamental real estate course covers the basic laws and principles of California real estate and provides the understanding, background, and terminology necessary for advanced study in specialized real estate courses. This course is required by the California Department of Real Estate prior to taking the Real Estate Salesperson's examination.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a basic knowledge of the fundamental concepts and principles of real estate.
  • define and use the technical terminology involved in the real estate field.
  • explain real estate transactions.
  • understand the necessary background and qualifications for the California Real Estate Salesperson's License Examination.

RE 310 Real Estate Practice

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:RE 300 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers operations in real estate: listing, prospecting, advertising, financing, sales techniques, escrow, and ethics. The course applies toward educational requirements for the broker's examination.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop a practical approach to real estate.
  • explain prospecting and sales techniques.
  • examine contracts and other instruments used in real estate.
  • design presentations utilized in the practice of real estate.

RE 320 Real Estate Finance

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:RE 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers real estate financing: lending policies and problems; financing transactions in residential, apartment, commercial, and special purpose properties; and methods of financing properties. This course applies towards educational requirements for broker's examination.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain finance and money.
  • discuss where we get money.
  • compare what kind of loans are available.
  • explain how to get a loan.
  • examine what happens after a loan is made.

RE 330 Legal Aspects of Real Estate

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:RE 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers California real estate law, including management, agency contracts and application to real estate transfer, conveyancing, probate proceedings, trust deeds, and foreclosure. Legislation governing real estate transactions is also covered. It applies toward educational requirements for the broker's examination.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine sources and origins of real estate law.
  • explain the legal aspect of contracts.
  • discuss the law of agency and regulations of real estate agents.
  • examine the creation and enforcement of security devices.

RE 342 Real Estate Appraisal

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:RE 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers entry-level education in the real estate appraisal field, concentrating on the appraisal of single-family residences (real property). It covers Basic Appraisal Principles (30 Hours) and Basic Appraisal Procedures (30 Hours) pursuant to the Appraiser Qualifications Board's (AQB) Real Property Appraiser Qualification Criteria (effective January 1, 2008). This course is designed to meet the California Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers (BREA) requirements for Basic Education (60 Hours). It also meets the California Bureau of Real Estate (BRE) college-level educational requirements (3 semester units) for the salesperson and broker examinations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define real property concepts, characteristics, and legal descriptions.
  • differentiate between the different forms of ownership, types of leases, contracts, and public or private controls.
  • describe the four influences on real estate values - government, economic, social, and physical.
  • identify the different types of value - market value, insurable value, salvage value, etc.
  • investigate economic principles related to real estate.
  • analyze real estate market fundamentals and characteristics.
  • interpret appraisal ethics and how these apply in appraisal theory and practice.
  • apply proper valuation procedures and techniques in developing a credible appraisal report.
  • analyze real property descriptions, characteristics, and considerations for highest and best use.
  • evaluate and apply the Market Approach, Cost Approach, and basic Income Approach processes.
  • demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to complete or review a residential appraisal (subject to practical experience and licensing) pursuant to current ethical standards and practices as mandated by the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP).

RE 350 Real Property Management

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:RE 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers operation and management of real property marketing procedures, leases, maintenance, insurance, accounting, records, public and human relations, employer responsibilities, and selection of personnel and agreements. It applies towards the educational requirements for the broker's examination.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the major functions of property managers, including their legal and interpersonal concerns.
  • detail specific practices and problems in management of various properties, such as retail property, office buildings, apartments, industrial property, and condominiums.
  • define the technical terminology in the property management field.
  • describe the requirements for the California Real Estate Broker's and Salesperson's License examinations.
  • demostrate practical tools for property management.
  • identify everyday issues regarding maintenance, accounting, administration, and other activities.

RE 360 Real Estate Economics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the nature and classification of land economics, development of property, construction and subdivision, economic values, and real estate evaluation. Real estate cycles and business fluctuations, residential market trends, real property, and special purpose property trends are also covered. This course applies toward educational requirements for the broker's examination.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain an understanding of the basic economic background for real estate analysis.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the real estate markets.
  • discuss the major influences on new real estate developments.
  • examine different real estate investments.

RE 370 Escrow Procedures

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:RE 300 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the functions and responsibilities of the escrow holder, including actual preparation of escrow instructions and documents in a typical real estate transaction. Audit, disbursement, the issuance of closing statements, and analysis of title insurance policies are covered. This course applies toward educational requirements for the broker's examination.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze problems related to escrow transactions.
  • demonstrate basic understanding of the fundamental principles and procedures involved in ordinary escrow transactions.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the content, purpose, and use of the basic forms and formats generally used in the processing of an escrow.
  • analyze the various types of title insurance policies.
  • explain the procedures used in opening, processing, and closing an escrow.
  • define, understand and use the technical terminology used in the escrow industry.

RE 380 Computer Applications in Real Estate

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces students to software applications used in the real estate industry for real estate practice, finance, appraisal, property management, and residential sales. This course applies toward the educational requirements for either a salesperson's or broker's license.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain how computer applications and technology enhance one's ability to engage in a real estate practice.
  • demonstrate the use of computer software create real estate contract forms used for listing, purchasing and disclosures required during a real estate transaction .
  • demonstrate the use of computer applications to create real estate flyers and other marketing materials.
  • design and create a real estate web site.
  • create a presentation using computer application presentation software.

RE 495 Independent Studies in Real Estate

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

An independent studies project involves an individual student or a small group of students in study, research, or activities beyond the regularly offered real estate courses. See the current catalog section of "Independent Studies" for full details.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study in real estate.
  • use information resources to gather discipline-specific information.
  • analyze and apply the knowledge, skills, and experience that are involved in the independent study to theoretical perspectives and/or concepts in the major discipline of study.

RE 497 Internship in Real Estate

  • Units:4
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:RE 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides students with a supervised, structured, hands-on experience in real estate and with the skills necessary to assist them in obtaining jobs in the real estate industry. Course content will include understanding the application of education to the workforce; the responsibilities of an internship; completion of Title V papers (the student's Application, Learning Objectives, Time sheet, and Evaluations), which document the students' progress and hours completed; and developing workplace skills identified by local employers. In addition to 18 hours of lecture, the student is required to complete an internship of 162 hours.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • reinforce and complement classroom study through application of planned and supervised on-the-job experiences.
  • explain the process for opening, managing and closing an escrow for the sale of a real estate property.
  • discuss the different methods used in the real estate industry for building a clientele.
  • compare the different type of financing available for purchasing a property.
  • explain the different types of inspections a buyer or lender would require during the purchase and financing of a property.

RE 499 Experimental Offering in Real Estate

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020