Communication

Communication (COMM) Courses

COMM 270 Communication Laboratory

  • Units:0.5 - 3
  • Hours:27 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in at least one Communication course.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides individualized, self-paced, and/or small group instruction in basic oral communication skills. Individualized instructional modules are designed to help the student acquire or improve communication skills in specific areas including public speaking, argumentation, small group communication, forensics speaking, intercultural communication, and interpersonal communication. Students may work with peer tutors and instructors to improve their understanding and skills in speech organization, preparation of presentation aids, delivery of oral messages, creating group agendas, etc. The course is graded as Pass/No Pass. Students earn 0.5 units for every 27 hours of coursework completed, allowing them to earn from 0.5-3 units.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate improvement and understanding of skills and content in the Communication courses in which the student is concurrently enrolled (e.g., courses covering topics in public speaking, group discussion, interpersonal communication, argumentation).

COMM 301 Introduction to Public Speaking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 and LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better, and concurrent enrollment in COMM 270.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course prepares students to speak in a variety of rhetorical situations: academic, professional, social, and political. Students develop skills in ethical research, analytical thinking and listening, organization and outlining, and effective verbal and nonverbal delivery of messages for diverse audiences. Each student will complete a minimum of twenty-two minutes of evaluated speaking time. This course is designed for students who already have college-level writing skills. Students conduct primary and secondary research to create informative and persuasive oral presentations and incorporate this research into formal outlines using APA or MLA style citations. Recording equipment may be used as an aid to the student's self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and is available on campus. Students may also be required to record speeches for instructor and peer feedback.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the skills necessary to compose, create, and present informative and persuasive messages, with an emphasis on an extemporaneous delivery style.
  • demonstrate competence in active listening skills and provide appropriate constructive feedback.
  • compose and present appropriate oral messages to diverse audiences in diverse contexts, including selection and use of supporting material and presentation aids, organizational structure, language choice, and delivery style.
  • analyze, develop, and implement strategies to productively manage oral communication apprehension to minimize its impact on the message.
  • apply ethical standards to every phase of the communication process (e.g., selection of arguments, support, and delivery).
  • demonstrate knowledge of classical rhetorical theories, communication theories, motivational theories, and psychosocial theories.

COMM 303 Mediated Oral Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:COMM 301 with a grade of "C" or better; Completion of CISA 340 with grade of "C" or better or proficiency with computer presentation graphics (e.g., PowerPoint)
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course focuses on the analysis and practice of effective oral communication using a variety of mediums with diverse audiences. Focus is placed on the design and delivery of oral messages in traditional public speaking situations as well as via auditory and visual channels. As this course meets the oral communication requirement, each student will complete oral presentations "live" in front of an audience (physically or virtually). Students are required to actively participate in online groups and deliver group oral presentations via video conferencing. This course is designed for students who already have college-level writing skills. Students conduct primary and secondary research to create informative and persuasive oral presentations and incorporate this research into outlines using APA or MLA style citations. Recording equipment, recording facilities, and access to a computer with online capabilities is required and is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and apply a variety of theories relative to public communication.
  • demonstrate critical listening and effective feedback.
  • use appropriate verbal and nonverbal communication techniques in oral presentations in mediated contexts (e.g., vocal quality, eye contact, movement, gestures, avoiding vocalized pauses).
  • construct and extemporaneously deliver oral messages (including informative and persuasive) to diverse audiences in diverse contexts, including selection and use of supporting material and presentation aids, organizational structure, language choice, and delivery style.
  • analyze, develop, and implement strategies to productively manage oral communication apprehension to minimize its impact on the message.
  • apply ethical standards to research and advocacy, including the integration of presentation aids.
  • adapt oral communication skills to mediated channels, including audio only and audiovisual.

COMM 305 Oral Interpretation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:COMM 301, ENGRD 310, and ENGWR 301 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 170
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces students to the field of performance studies through the oral interpretation of various literary forms, including Western and Non-Western forms of literature. Theoretical issues and historical developments are examined and applied to the current performance trends in solo, duo, and interpreters' theater. The focus is on audience analysis, selection, and thematic analysis of literature, discussion, and application of vocal and physiological delivery techniques, program performance, and post-performance evaluation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify historical and theoretical foundations of the field of oral interpretation.
  • construct, perform, and evaluate individual and group oral presentations of literature.
  • research various types of Western and non-Western literary works, including poetry, prose, and drama for performance.
  • analyze and evaluate a variety of literary selections to determine merit for inclusion in a cohesive script.
  • assemble literary selections thematically to support the thesis of an oral interpretation program.
  • assess the importance of narration, dialogue, and themes in literary selections and be able to choose among competing elements to create a unified, coherent literary script.
  • analyze and adapt literature performances to diverse audiences.
  • demonstrate a range of verbal and non-verbal communication techniques when interpreting literature for a live audience.

COMM 311 Argumentation and Debate

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:Completion of COMM 301 with a grade of "C" or better, LIBR 320 with a grade of "C" or better, and concurrent enrollment in COMM 270.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1C
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces students to the role of argument in public discourse. Students develop presentational skills necessary for public advocacy. Assignments include researching, preparing, and presenting sound arguments, as well as developing strategies for refuting others' arguments. Students will explore areas of social, economic, and political controversy through the format of academic debate. Recording equipment may be used as an aid to the student's self-analysis and improvement.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the history and role of argumentation and debate.
  • synthesize the nature and function of argumentation in various contexts.
  • construct and deconstruct oral and written arguments according to a variety of argumentative models.
  • recognize and evaluate the impact of fallacies in written, oral, and visual arguments.
  • create and deliver persuasive messages that demonstrate adaptation to audience attitudes, values, beliefs, and preferences.
  • utilize strategies to minimize communication apprehension.
  • identify and use ethical principles in argumentation and debate.
  • demonstrate individual responsibility, integrity, respect, and influence to effectively and appropriately communicate with diverse people.
  • identify and demonstrate effective and appropriate written communication skills utilizing research in the construction of an organized argument.
  • construct, deliver, and evaluate a variety of oral and written arguments using stock issues and negative strategies (including argument presentation, refutation, rebuttal, and cross-examination).

COMM 315 Persuasion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Completion of LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 190
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course presents fundamental theories and techniques of persuasion as they occur in various communication contexts, including commercial, interpersonal, public, and mass media. Students develop critical thinking skills by engaging in oral and written analysis, evaluation, and composition of persuasive messages and by examining the personal, political, cultural, and social impacts of persuasion. Students explore ethical considerations of persuasive communication; learn about types of reasoning; and identify fallacious arguments as they occur in persuasion.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify persuasive strategies as they exist in a variety of contexts (e.g., public speaking, advertising, politics, media), including use in propaganda and subliminal techniques.
  • identify and apply humanistic and social scientific approaches to persuasion.
  • analyze, evaluate, and demonstrate persuasive messages, including identifying and explaining the persuasive components or strategies used to effect change.
  • identify and differentiate among inductive/deductive reasoning and fallacious arguments as they occur in persuasive communication.
  • evaluate and formulate criteria for the development of successful persuasive campaigns.
  • design and deliver ethical persuasive messages directed toward a specific audience and apply evaluation criteria to determine potential success.
  • articulate differences between various types of audience research techniques.
  • identify and apply ethical criteria to persuasive appeals (e.g., legal, religious, political, human nature, situational, dialogical).

COMM 316 Advanced Argumentation and Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:LIBR 325 or LIBT 325 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to extend students' critical thinking, argumentation, and reasoning in the context of the communication environment. The goal is to expand understanding of their logical processes and their relation to both written and spoken communication. Students will develop the ability to analyze, criticize, and advocate for ideas; to reason inductively and deductively; and to reach well-supported factual or judgmental conclusions. Elementary inductive and deductive processes will be covered, including an understanding of the formal and informal fallacies of language and thought and the ability to distinguish matters of fact from issues of judgment or opinion. Significant emphasis will be on the sophistication of written skills surrounding argument and rhetoric. Students will write a minimum of 6,500 words.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and apply various theoretical models of argumentation in a variety of communication contexts.
  • apply critical thinking to evidence and reasoning in oral and written messages, both as a sender and receiver of messages.
  • identify and refute fallacies in a variety of formats, including print, sound, motion, and digital media.
  • evaluate components of an argument (claim, reasoning, evidence, etc.).
  • conduct effective research.
  • refute arguments using tests of reasoning and evidence.
  • design and deliver appropriate, effective, and ethical messages to diverse audiences.
  • identify and analyze diverse perspectives in the development and delivery of oral and written arguments.
  • apply appropriate and effective listening and reading skills to comprehend written and oral messages.

COMM 321 Interpersonal Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better, or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process, and completion of ENGRD 110 or ESLR 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4G
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course focuses on the exploration of communication skills associated with establishing and maintaining satisfying interpersonal relationships. Through theory, discussion, simulations, and structured exercises, students will explore various approaches to successful communication in interpersonal contexts. This course strives to increase an individual's interpersonal communication effectiveness through heightened awareness and greater skill as both a sender and receiver of shared messages.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • 1. identify and apply a variety of theories relevant to interpersonal communication. (SLO #1)
  • a. contrast interpersonal communication with other forms of communication (e.g., intrapersonal communication, impersonal communication, public communication).
  • b. demonstrate understanding and application of fundamental theories (e.g., models, theories) of relational dynamics.
  • 2. analyze the impact of individual variables in the communication process. (SLO #2)
  • a. analyze the role of the individual as both a sender and receiver in the communication process.
  • b. differentiate between self-concept and self-esteem and evaluate the impact of each on communication.
  • c. analyze the impact of perception in effective interpersonal communication.
  • d. assess the impact of intercultural communication and adapt communication appropriately in interpersonal communication.
  • e. demonstrate and evaluate the use and effect of verbal and nonverbal symbols in interpersonal communication.
  • 3. differentiate the various factors involved in communication that enhance or restrict communication effectiveness in relational systems. (SLO #3)
  • a. apply appropriate listening styles and assess the importance of effective listening in producing satisfying interpersonal relationships.
  • b. assess interpersonal conflict in communication and differentiate amongst general strategies to manage conflict effectively, including the expression of emotions.
  • c. contrast factors that contribute to supportive and defensive communication climates (e.g., honesty, empathy, provisionalism) and incorporate supportive communication behaviors.
  • d. diagnose self-disclosure approaches and their impact in interpersonal relationships.
  • e. evaluate the role of ethical standards on interpersonal communication and the impact of various relational challenges.

COMM 325 Intercultural Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better, or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process, and completion of ENGRD 110 or ESLR 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4G
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces students to the challenges and promises of intercultural communication emphasizing the various aspects of co-cultures within the United States. Variations and commonalities in communication patterns across cultures are examined. Communication processes and outcomes between persons of different cultural backgrounds are also explored. The course emphasizes practical application of factors that influence communication between individuals of different cultures.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the evolution and multidisciplinary nature of theories and perspectives related to intercultural communication (e.g., definition of terms, conflict, barriers to intercultural competence).
  • analyze the impact of intercultural communication in a variety of contexts (e.g., work environment, interpersonal relationships, persuasive appeals).
  • analyze evidence and reasoning to identify and provide appropriate and credible support for written and oral communication in diverse contexts.
  • analyze the influence of verbal and nonverbal messages as related to communication barriers across cultures.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the impact of individual responsibility, ethics, respect, and influence in effectively and appropriately communicating with diverse people.
  • analyze the impact of culture on individual identity.

COMM 331 Group Discussion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 and LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better, and concurrent enrollment in COMM 270.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course prepares students to understand and analyze group dynamics and to function more effectively in task and social groups. The course addresses communication concepts and behaviors including problem solving, decision making, leadership, group roles, norms, and conformity. Each student will complete a minimum of twenty-two minutes of evaluated speaking time through oral presentations (individual or group). This course is designed for students who already have college-level writing skills. Students conduct primary and secondary research to create informative and persuasive oral presentations and incorporate this research into formal outlines using APA or MLA style citations. Recording equipment may be used as an aid to the student's self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • 1. demonstrate an understanding of the evolution and multidisciplinary nature of group communication theories. (SLO #1)
  • 2. identify and apply theoretical approaches to group development, leadership, decision making, power, and conflict in group communication. (SLO #2)
  • a. prioritize criteria to enhance group decision making.
  • b. generate ideas utilizing standardized problem solving techniques.
  • c. integrate and validate group members' contributions to create collaborative solutions and provide effective feedback.
  • d. plan, organize, and record group meeting progress through the use of agendas and minutes to accomplish goals.
  • e. analyze communication role behaviors in group interactions and evaluate their impact on group dynamics.
  • 3. design and organize presentations for diverse audiences. (SLO #3)
  • a. plan and organize informative and persuasive presentations.
  • b. analyze evidence and reasoning to identify and provide appropriate and credible support for written and oral communication across diverse contexts.
  • c. apply ethical standards to every phase of the communication process (e.g., selection of arguments, support, and use of appropriate academic form).
  • 4. identify and demonstrate effective and appropriate oral communication skills, both verbal and nonverbal across diverse contexts. (SLO #4)
  • a. present informative and persuasive oral presentations.
  • b. apply ethical standards to the communication process (e.g., selection of arguments, support, and delivery).
  • c. demonstrate professionalism in oral presentations (e.g., professionalism, vocal variety, eye contact, use of notes, and presentation aids).

COMM 335 Conflict Management

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the communication behaviors involved in the process of interpersonal, work group, and organizational conflicts. Course content will focus on conceptual understanding of theoretical foundations in the social sciences. Application and activities will address the components of conflict and the strategies by which conflict may effectively be managed in personal and professional settings.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify theoretical principles associated with conflict in social sciences literature and research.
  • describe various practices and strategies for improving interpersonal skills in conflict management.
  • demonstrate effective conflict communication strategies in formal and informal settings.
  • utilize various assessment tools to develop tactics for effective conflict management.
  • illustrate various nonverbal (physiological) aspects of conflict.
  • interpret emotional (physiological) reactions to conflict situations.
  • develop principles for successful negotiations in a variety of settings.
  • design appropriate third-party mediation and intervention strategies.
  • conduct conflict management scenarios applying models and strategies based on best practices.
  • critique various approaches to conflict management models and provide recommendations for various contexts.
  • synthesize a variety of cues from scenarios including cultural diversity, gender, and power dynamics to make recommendations for effective problem solving.
  • analyze negotiation strategies for win/win, win/lose, game theory, and zero sum approaches to managing conflict situations.
  • evaluate emotional intelligence and how it impacts our psychological health, physiological well-being, and decision-making in organizations and society.

COMM 341 Organizational Communication

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better, or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process, and completion of ENGRD 110 or ESLR 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area D7
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to allow students to examine both theoretical and pragmatic essentials of effective organizational communication from preparation and presentation to effective observation and analysis. Students will explore the dynamics of organizational communication in various situations including focus groups, quality control groups, ad hoc committees, conflict negotiation teams, and problem solving and decision making groups. The roles of internal and external messages in the communication process and organizational effectiveness will be examined and analyzed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine communication theory as it applies to organizations.
  • illustrate influences of organizational culture on various types of organizations, purposes, and industries; examining impact of economic, political, and cultural models on various organizations.
  • identify types of power and analyze relationships between power, conflict, and leadership.
  • compare and critique the various theoretical perspectives of leadership.
  • analyze and implement conflict management strategies in a variety of organizational situations.
  • identify and analyze types of communication networks.
  • describe the various historical and theoretical approaches to studying organizations including classical, human relations, human resources, critical, and standpoint theory.
  • critique the implications of technology and service culture for the changing landscape of organizations.
  • assemble the necessary communication components to create a working organization.
  • predict the effects of globalization, cultural diversity, and outsourcing on current industries and organizations based on theoretical principles.
  • demonstrate the application of communication strategies in contemporary organizations.

COMM 351 Mass Media and Society

  • Same As:ENGWR 384 and JOUR 310
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 through the assessment process
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D4; IGETC Area 4G
  • C-ID:C-ID JOUR 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is an interdisciplinary course exploring aspects of communication and the impact of mass media on the individual and society. The survey includes basic communication models, books, magazines, newspapers, recordings, movies, radio, television, advertising, public relations, the Internet, theories of communication, relationships between mass media and business and government, and processes and effects from a social science perspective. Credit may be awarded for only one section of either COMM 351, ENGWR 384, or JOUR 310.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the basic principles of each form of basic communication.
  • demonstrate an understanding of mass media and its relationship to the public.
  • differentiate among news, opinion, feature writing, and electronic presentations.
  • analyze and evaluate each form of media.
  • assess the impact of media messages on various audiences.

COMM 361 The Communication Experience

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 and LIBR 318 with a grade of C or better, and concurrent enrollment in COMM 270.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course, students analyze and practice effective communication in a variety of settings with diverse audiences. Focus is placed on effective communication in groups, facilitation of interpersonal relationships, and methods of managing conflict, as well as message design and delivery for multiple purposes and to diverse audiences. Students are required to actively participate in groups and deliver individual and group oral presentations. Each student will complete a minimum of twenty-two minutes of evaluated speaking time through oral presentations. This course is designed for students who already have college-level writing skills. Students conduct primary and secondary research to create informative and persuasive oral presentations, and incorporate this research into formal outlines using APA or MLA style citations. Recording equipment may be used as an aid to the student's self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and is available on campus.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and apply a variety of theories relative to interpersonal, small group, and public communication.
  • utilize a variety of communication strategies to increase effectiveness in interpersonal relationships with diverse communicators.
  • demonstrate critical listening and effective feedback.
  • assess the impact of intercultural communication on various aspects of communication.
  • analyze communication behaviors and roles in group interactions and make recommendations to improve effectiveness of group communication behaviors, including methods of managing conflict.
  • use appropriate verbal and nonverbal communication techniques in oral presentations, interpersonal, and group settings (e.g., vocal quality, eye contact, movement, gestures, avoiding vocalized pauses).
  • construct and extemporaneously deliver oral presentations (including informative, persuasive) to varying audiences, utilizing and appropriately documenting research from various sources according to a standard referencing style (MLA, APA, etc.).
  • apply ethical standards to research and advocacy, including the integration of presentation aids.

COMM 374 Forensics Laboratory

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:9 - 18 hours LEC; 27 - 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:COMM 301 or COMM 311 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID COMM 160B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Through individualized instruction and participation in public speaking events, academic debate, or literature interpretation, students will develop speaking, organization, and listening skills, as well as the ability to recognize matters of political, social, and economic importance. This course helps students develop their skills as critical thinkers and competent speakers, giving practice in preparing for and participating in at least one officially sanctioned intercollegiate forensics competition. Areas of interest include academic debate, platform speeches (persuasive, informative, speech to entertain, communication analysis), limited preparation speeches (impromptu, extemporaneous), and oral interpretation of literature performances.

As all students must participate in at least one intercollegiate forensics tournament, field trips to tournaments and other speaking events are required. The course may be taken four times for a maximum of twelve units.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the theories and principles of communication through a variety of competitive contexts: debate, platform speeches, limited preparation speeches, and oral interpretation of literature performances.
  • evaluate the research process, development, revision, and delivery of competitive oral presentations.
  • implement strategies to manage communication apprehension.
  • demonstrate the practical application of communication techniques in public and academic debate, social discourse, and literature interpretation.
  • analyze matters of political, social, and economic importance in relation to communication.
  • demonstrate competency in active listening, organization, critical thinking, and oral presentation skills.
  • employ audience analysis to create, adapt, and deliver oral messages to a live audience.
  • recognize the ethical issues inherent in public discourse and competitive forensics.

COMM 481 Introduction to Public Speaking - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 through the assessment process
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for admission to the Honors Program.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 and LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better, and concurrent enrollment in COMM 270.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A1; IGETC Area 1C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course prepares students to speak in a variety of rhetorical situations: academic, professional, social, and political. Students develop skills in ethical research, analytical thinking and listening, organization and outlining, and effective verbal and nonverbal delivery of messages for diverse audiences. Each student will complete a minimum of 22 minutes of evaluated speaking time. This course is designed for students who already have college-level writing skills. Students conduct primary and secondary research to create informative and persuasive oral presentations and incorporate this research into formal outlines using APA or MLA style citations. Recording equipment may be used as an aid to the student's self-analysis and improvement. Access to a computer with online capabilities may be required and is available on campus. Students may also be required to record speeches for instructor and peer feedback.
As an Honors Course, this course requires students to (1) compose and present professional conference paper presentations, (2) learn about and demonstrate competence in Q & A sessions following presentations, and (3) analyze and apply critical evaluation skills through academic papers.
This course is not open to students who have completed COMM 301.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the skills necessary to compose, create, and present informative and persuasive messages, with an emphasis on an extemporaneous delivery style.
  • demonstrate competence in active listening skills and provide appropriate constructive feedback.
  • compose and present appropriate oral messages to diverse audiences in diverse contexts, including selection and use of supporting material and presentation aids, organizational structure, language choice, and delivery style.
  • analyze, develop, and implement strategies to productively manage oral communication apprehension to minimize its impact on the message.
  • apply ethical standards to every phase of the communication process (e.g., selection of arguments, support, and delivery).
  • demonstrate knowledge of classical rhetorical theories, communication theories, motivational theories, and psychosocial theories.

COMM 494 Topics in Communication

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to enable both Communication and non-Communication majors to learn about recent developments in communication. Selected topics would not be part of current course offerings. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate analytical and critical thinking skills as they relate to the study of communication.
  • demonstrate understanding of and apply principles of communication.
  • collect (through research) and interpret data related to the topic area content.

COMM 495 Independent Studies in Communication

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course involves an individual student or small groups of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regular offered courses, pursuant to an agreement among college, faculty members, and students. Independent studies in communication offers students a chance to do research that is more typical of industry and graduate student work. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • produce work independently on communication-related topics.
  • debate communication topics with other professionals in the field.

COMM 499 Experimental Offering in Communication

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020