English

English - Creative Writing (ENGCW) Courses

ENGCW 400 Creative Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course emphasizes writing of poetry, short fiction, and autobiography. It includes analysis of student work by the instructor and class in a workshop atmosphere. Students explore their creativity through the medium of language and learn the techniques of poetry, fiction, and autobiography while also developing an appreciation of literature by creating it. Students will also learn and apply historical and aesthetic criticism throughout the creative process by reading and evaluating literary work through the ages from various cultures. This analytical work will help students understand the literary arts as part of human history.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and practice the specific skills involved in writing poetry, fiction, and autobiography.
  • identify the influence of historical and aesthetic elements throughout the creative process.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the use of structural elements of writing poetry, fiction, and non-fiction within the historical tradition of literature.
  • analyze the expression of philosophical, religious, and ethical dilemmas throughout history as expressed through the creation of literature.
  • apply the structural elements of poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction to analytical reading.
  • synthesize structural elements of poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction into the creative process.
  • compare literary work of professional literary writers and peers.
  • evaluate his/her own creative work and that of peers.
  • create a portfolio of original writing.

ENGCW 410 Fiction Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed for students who wish to develop an appreciation for the literary art of fiction. The course will include workshops of student-generated short stories and novel chapters. Through lecture, discussion, assigned reading, and in-class writing exercises, students will examine critically the elements of literary creation and develop criteria of aesthetic judgment. Students will keep journals and prepare portfolios of their original fiction.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and compare works of professional literary fiction using a historical framework.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the use of structural elements of writing fiction.
  • analyze the expression of philosophical, religious, and ethical dilemmas throughout history as expressed through the creation of literature.
  • produce a portfolio of short stories and/or novel chapters.
  • practice methods of revision and apply them to his/her own work.
  • appraise student fiction in the workshop setting.

ENGCW 420 Poetry Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is a creative writing course for students who wish to concentrate on poetry writing. Through lecture, discussion, assigned reading, collaborative writing projects, and in-class writing exercises, students will examine literary devices in contemporary poetry and will practice revising and editing. The workshop format will focus on analysis of poetry written by students in the class. Students will create their own work and critique the work of others. Students will prepare a portfolio of original work. In learning to synthesize the history of poetry, they will also read, appraise, and analyze poetry from various eras and cultures.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critically analyze and compare works of professional literary poetry from various genres and historical periods to distinguish approaches and poetic elements and broaden an appreciation for style.
  • evaluate and identify structural elements of poetry such as imagery, metaphor, point of view, rhyme, rhythm, alliteration, and fixed forms in the historical context and tradition of poetic literature.
  • analyze the expression of philosophical, religious, and ethical dilemmas throughout history as expressed through the creation of poetry.
  • appraise and evaluate student poems in a workshop setting.
  • examine and appraise the quality of his or her own writing.
  • produce and assemble a portfolio of original poetry.

ENGCW 430 Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is a creative writing course in creative non-fiction. The class focuses on constructive, in-class analysis of personal essays written by students, as well as critical analysis of literary works of creative non-fiction, including autobiography. Through lecture, discussion, collaborative writing, the study of texts that outline the criteria and traditions of creative non-fiction writing, out of class interviews, and in-class writing exercises, students will critically examine the elements of personal, ecological, multi-cultural, multi-generational, multi-disciplinary and mythological writing. Students will interview family members and other people of personal significance, keep a journal and prepare a portfolio of completed work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • produce autobiographical essays.
  • examine sources of multi-generational writing.
  • compile a portfolio of essays.
  • critically examine examples of literary autobiography for theme, structure, and style.
  • practice methods of revision.
  • critically analyze student essays.
  • demonstrate an aesthetic understanding and ability to make value judgments about autobiography from a variety of cultures and historical time periods.

ENGCW 431 Autobiography Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is a creative writing workshop in autobiography and creative non-fiction. The class focuses on constructive, in-class analysis of personal essays written by students, as well as critical analysis of literary works in autobiography and creative non-fiction. Through lecture, discussion, collaborative writing, the study of texts that outline the criteria and traditions of autobiographical writing, out-of-class interviews, and in-class writing exercises, students will critically examine the elements of personal, ecological, multi-cultural, multi-generational, multi-disciplinary, and mythological writing. Students will interview family members and other people of personal significance, keep a journal, and prepare a portfolio of completed work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • produce autobiographical essays.
  • examine sources of multi-generational writing.
  • compile a portfolio of essays.
  • critically examine examples of literary autobiography for theme, structure, and style.
  • practice methods of revision.
  • critically analyze student essays.
  • demonstrate an aesthetic understanding and ability to make value judgments about autobiography from a variety of cultures and historical time periods.

ENGCW 433 Writing as a Healing Art

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course emphasizes journal writing as a model for creative writing projects and as a vehicle for healing using the Amherst Writers and Artists method of journal writing. Students will write extensively in journals throughout the semester and then turn some of those writings into finished pieces of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students will prepare a portfolio of original work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use the Amherst Writers and Artists method of therapeutic journal writing and critiquing.
  • create first drafts of poems, short stories, and autobiographical essays from journal entries.
  • apply editing techniques about creative writing style to refine drafts of poems, short stories, or autobiographical essays.
  • analyze his/her own and peers' writing to see if it meets criteria established in class (fresh language, original metaphors and similes, a well-developed character, etc.) for what makes a good poem, short story, and autobiographical essay.
  • demonstrate critical listening skills while evaluating peers' writing.
  • evaluate his/her own writing as well as peers’ writing for mechanics, proofreading, and concision.
  • produce a portfolio of his/her journal writings and pieces of creative writing.
  • demonstrate the ability to write to facilitate psychological process.
  • recognize the psychological value of therapeutic writing and incorporate it into his/her life.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the psychological theory behind therapeutic writing.

ENGCW 450 College Literary Magazine

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGCW 400, 410, or 420; with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides instruction in techniques and experience in editing and structuring the college literary magazine, Susurrus. Students will select and edit manuscripts in the genres of poetry, short fiction, and creative non-fiction. A field trip is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and apply writing process in a literary magazine.
  • compose publicity to solicit writing and visual art from the college community.
  • generate criteria for literary excellence and evaluate creative writing based on those criteria.
  • analyze and appraise the history and tradition of literary publication.
  • apply critical thinking skills: identifying and defining issues related to editing and production; analyze and evaluate literary pieces.

ENGCW 451 College Literary Magazine: Production

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGCW 450; with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The course provides experience in producing the college literary magazine, Susurrus, from selecting and editing manuscripts to formatting and readying the entire text for publication. Discussions span from text and art layout to website applications and management. Students will plan and present a college literary reading.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the production process from creation of manuscript to design and publication of a magazine.
  • identify and define issues related to editing and production; collaborate to analyze and evaluate literary pieces and other information related to production; synthesize and develop conclusions.
  • create, design, and produce (through collaboration with entire staff) a large, multi-faceted public literary reading.

ENGCW 495 Independent Studies in English - Creative Writing

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Independent study allows a student or small group of students to work directly with an instructor independent of a structured class or course. The instructor and student(s) typically develop a contract together, outlining the course of study. Variable units enable maximum flexibility in creating this course of study. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • produce a portfolio of creative work.
  • create drafts and revisions.
  • express appreciation for the craft of creative writing.

ENGCW 499 Experimental Offering in English - Creative Writing

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


English - Education (ENGED) Courses

ENGED 305 Structure of English

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a study of the structure of English grammar systems, especially as they relate to writing. It includes the study and practice of traditional and transformational grammar and standard usage, with emphasis on the relationship of grammar to writing (2,000 word writing requirement); it also includes the study of the history of the English language and varied methods of language acquisition within the culturally diverse population of California schools with emphasis on the Common Core. It is designed for those who plan to teach or who are especially interested in grammar as it relates to writing. One hour per week practicum is also required; this is met by tutoring in an English approved setting (15 hours total).

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine the history and structure of English.
  • compare and contrast the methods of language acquisition, including acquisition of English among culturally diverse populations.
  • analyze and apply principles of phonology and orthography.
  • apply the principles of traditional and transformational English grammars as those principles relate to writing.
  • apply knowledge of standard usage and differentiate between standard and non-standard usage in writing.
  • employ critical thinking skills in making appropriate rhetorical choices based on grammatical considerations.
  • apply techniques such as sentence diagramming and combining to explain relationships between grammar and writing.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the scope and sequence of the Common Core Language Standards

ENGED 320 Service Learning: Tutoring Elementary Students in Reading

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must show proof of a negative TB test and have background check and fingerprinting completed prior to beginning work in the schools.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course offers students an opportunity to learn and practice basic methods of tutoring elementary children in reading. Students will meet on campus for the first part of the semester to be trained and then will be assigned to an elementary school where they will have in-depth practice tutoring elementary children who are reading below grade level. This course can meet the field experience requirement for teacher preparation programs.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify word analysis techniques.
  • evaluate reading skills by analyzing a variety of assessments.
  • manage time effectively in the preparation and implementation of lesson plans.
  • design and implement lesson plans incorporating appropriate activities for improving reading skills, while individualizing instruction to adapt to various learning styles.
  • analyze the ways in which a reader's interactions with the text impact reading ability.
  • apply principles of motivation, behavior modification, and memory enhancement for effective instruction.
  • analyze areas of reading deficiency and implement effective remediation strategies.
  • demonstrate appropriate interpersonal communication skills when interacting with students from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic groups.

ENGED 326 Teaching Reading Strategies Across the Curriculum

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 310, ENGRD 312, or ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course addresses reading and critical thinking strategies to prepare students to become fluent, independent readers in K-12 and college-level courses across the disciplines. Application of the California Common Core Standards is also included. This course is recommended for future educators, K-12 teachers, and community college instructors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe and apply the process of reading across disciplines.
  • apply teaching tools for assessing student needs and strengths.
  • describe and teach strategies for critical reading and elements of comprehension.
  • demonstrate effective teaching strategies for vocabulary development.
  • analyze and apply effective digital literacy practices.
  • teach students to implement strategic study strategies and test taking techniques.

ENGED 495 Independent Studies in English - Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Independent study allows a student or small group of students to work directly with an instructor independent of a structured class or course. The instructor and student(s) typically develop a contract together, outlining the course of study. Variable units enable maximum flexibility in creating this course of study. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate increased knowledge of educational strategies in the English classroom.

ENGED 499 Experimental Offering in English - Education

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


English - Laboratory (ENGLB) Courses

ENGLB 55 Individualized Reading and Writing Skills

  • Units:0.5 - 2
  • Hours:27 - 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides individualized, self-paced instruction of reading and writing skills. Students meet with an instructor for diagnosis of reading and writing needs, and an agreed-upon prescription is determined. Students are awarded units based on successful completion of assigned work, required time, and conferences with their lab instructor. Students are highly encouraged to enroll for one-half unit but may earn up to one unit per semester by completing 27 hours of work for each half unit. This course may be taken for a maximum of 2 units over multiple semesters, with each course constructed to assist students in their needs for that semester. The course is designed for students enrolled in a reading or writing course, but is open to any students who wish to work on their individual reading and writing skills for college. Students may register until the end of the ninth week of the semester and as space allows. The course is graded on a Pass/No Pass basis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate reading and vocabulary skills by following a diagnostic prescriptive methodology.
  • build vocabulary base and employ vocabulary development techniques.
  • demonstrate literal and inferential comprehension.
  • demonstrate general reading abilities that will lead to success in college-level reading tasks.
  • evaluate their writing to identify the elements and concepts that they must address in assigned reading and writing.
  • evaluate their writing projects in terms of main ideas, development, organization, sentence structure, and grammar.
  • demonstrate and apply knowledge of the writing process to different types of written assignments.

ENGLB 299 Experimental Offering in English - Laboratory

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


English - Literature (ENGLT) Courses

ENGLT 301 Introduction to Literature in Hip-Hop Culture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 and LIBR 318
  • Transferable:CSU (effective Summer 2020)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys the literature that exists within Hip-Hop culture. Students will learn to apply critical literary analysis skills while exploring literature across multiple genres within Hip-Hop culture (including poetry, memoir, song, and film). The course will explore how the historical, cultural, racial, social and political context of Hip-Hop literary works shape the creative process and products. Students will also explore the evolution of Hip-Hop as a complex culture with various creative outputs, not just a musical genre.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of various forms of Hip-Hop literature.
  • apply critical methods in analyzing and evaluating Hip-Hop works.
  • assess and examine Hip-Hop literature analyzing the role of regional, social and historical context.
  • synthesize ideas and themes from original Hip-Hop works and secondary sources.

ENGLT 303 Introduction to the Short Story

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to introduce students to the art of the short story. It will provide a history of the short story and distinguishing characteristics of the genre. The emphasis will be on the connection between literature and the human experience. The purpose will be to help students develop an appreciation, understanding, and knowledge of literature.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze short stories written in English (and other stories translated into English).
  • apply critical analysis, evaluate and support conclusions, write clear papers, and engage in analytical verbal discussions around the texts.
  • appraise structural elements of short fiction (such as character, plot, point of view, symbolism, etc.) in discussions and writing about short fiction.
  • compile, analyze, synthesize, and cite secondary sources in analyses of short stories.
  • determine philosophical influences on a given work and have an awareness of the historical and social significance of a writer and her/his work.
  • create and defend value judgments based on your knowledge of the text, structural elements of literature, and literary criticism around a given text
  • examine the conflicts and issues presented in short fiction as emblematic of the historical period in which the stories were produced.
  • distinguish the connections between literary themes and life experiences.

ENGLT 304 Introduction to Poetry

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Designed to introduce students to the art of poetry, ENGLT 304 includes analysis and appreciation of poems by a wide variety of traditional and contemporary poets. This course focuses on how to respond as a reader and how to help give poetry meaning in the light of one's accumulated feelings, interests, and ideas. Work in the course includes writing at least four analytical essays, including in-class exams and out-of-class assignments.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • integrate conventions of poetic discourse into analytical essays on poetry.
  • appraise and compare individual poems, periods, and authors.
  • analyze and evaluate poems in the historical, cultural, and social contexts in which they were written.
  • analyze poetry in light of universal and individual human experience.

ENGLT 310 English Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys significant works in the English language from Beowulf through the works of Alexander Pope. This course requires critical reading of poetry, novels, essays, and plays, as well as written analysis and significant research about these texts or authors. Students will also examine the historical and cultural environments in which the literature was created. Other works and writers include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Geoffrey Chaucer, Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, John Milton, John Donne, Renaissance lyric poets, Aphra Behn, and Jonathan Swift.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess the contributions of major writers to the development of English literature.
  • analyze the literature critically and draw inferences about the texts assigned.
  • integrate relevant literary criticism into oral and written discussions of the literature.
  • evaluate literary works by examining the historical and cultural environments in which they were written.
  • write paragraphs and essays that interpret, analyze, and evaluate the literature and successfully incorporate quoted and paraphrased passages into the student's own writing.

ENGLT 311 English Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 165
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys significant works in the English language from Romanticism in the 18th Century to post colonialism in the 20th century. Students will read poetry, novels, plays, and nonfiction prose by a variety of authors, including Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, the Brownings, Tennyson, Dickens, Yeats, Joyce, Woolf, Ezekiel, and Walcott.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the significant writers, works, and ideas contributing to the development of English literature from Romanticism to the present.
  • formulate and develop critical interpretations and analyses of various literary and critical texts.
  • compare literary and historical periods, movements, authors, and texts.
  • evaluate major literary theories and apply them to texts in writing.
  • produce literary analyses that are well written and adequately researched and demonstrate some sophistication and insight.

ENGLT 317 The English Bible as Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 and ESLR 320 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement through the assessment process
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces students to some of the literary forms found in the Bible: the poems, proverbs, short stories, wisdom literature, drama, epics, and epistles that are the bases of some of the most enduring symbols and allusions in the literature of the Western world. At the same time, it introduces them to the major Bible characters on whose lives these poems, short stories, wisdom literature, drama, epistles, and epics are centered. Additionally, the course traces the influence of the Bible on the works of selected authors. It is not a study of Jewish or Christian doctrine, nor is it a Bible study course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of biblical literary genres.
  • identify biblical poems, parables, short stories, drama, and epics.
  • analyze selected characters and issues raised in the poems, parables, short stories, drama, and epics in the Bible.
  • recount the plots, characters, and issues found in the biblical poems, parables, short stories, drama, and epics.
  • formulate written responses to some of the poems, parables, short stories, drama, and epics contained in the Bible.
  • summarize selected poems, parables, short stories, drama, and epics found in the Bible;.
  • critique the rich body of poems, parables, short stories, drama, and epics covered in the course.
  • identify in Western literary works those plots, symbols, and allusions that are biblical in origin.
  • match selected characters and themes in Western literary works with the biblical characters and themes they reference.
  • locate biblical allusions and metaphors in Western literary works.

ENGLT 320 American Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys representative works in American literature from approximately 1492-1865. Readings and discussion will highlight the multicultural nature of American literature and society. Texts include Native American myths, writing of the colonial period and the American Revolution, slave narratives, Romantic fiction, and poetry from the seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth century. Students will read a variety of stories, novels, autobiographical narratives, and poetry by such authors as Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Fredrick Douglass, Anne Bradstreet, Washington Irving, Harriet Jacobs, Herman Melville, and Phillis Wheatley.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the significant authors and literary developments of the United States up through the American Civil War.
  • formulate and develop critical interpretations and analyses of various literary and critical texts.
  • analyze and evaluate literary texts in the historical, cultural, social, and political contexts in which they were written.
  • produce essays and other written responses that interpret, analyze, and evaluate the literature and successfully incorporate quoted and paraphrased material into his or her own writing.

ENGLT 321 American Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 135
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys representative works in American literature from approximately 1865 to the present. Readings and discussion will highlight the multicultural nature of American literature and society. Students will read a variety of stories, novels, plays, and poetry by such authors as Mark Twain, Henry James, Kate Chopin, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Langston Hughes, Zora Neal Hurston, Black Elk, Richard Wright, Toni Morrison, Sandra Cisneros, and Maxine Hong Kingston.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the significant authors and literary developments of the United States from the American Civil War to the present.
  • critically analyze and develop comparisons between individual texts, interpretations, and literary movements.
  • evaluate the literature in relation to its cultural contexts as well as contemporary literary theories.

ENGLT 327 Literature of California

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the literature of California in the context of its ethnic, social, political, and geographical history. The course will examine a wide range of literature (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays) including but not limited to Native American legends, early California exploration accounts, prose and poetry from the California heartland, childhood memoirs, and more, with emphasis on what makes the California experience unique.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an appreciation of the richness and diversity of California through its literature.
  • demonstrate the ability to read analytically and critically to discover the ethnic and cultural diversity of California.
  • examine California-generated literature, comparing and contrasting the authors' multi-cultural values.
  • analyze and evaluate in written and oral form the literature of California.
  • recognize the connections between California literature of the past and present to issues/concerns faced by Californians today.

ENGLT 328 Literature and The Environment

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to literature with an emphasis on American environmental literature. Study will include major figures, themes, and historical periods; different cultural perspectives on the relationship between humans and the natural nonhuman world; the role women have played in the development of the genre; and the relationship between environmental literature and emerging environmental concerns.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define environmental literature as a genre.
  • identify and read selected major figures in environmental literature and analyze their contribution to the genre.
  • compare and contrast the ways in which the human relationship to the nonhuman world has been imagined in literature from two or more cultures.
  • critique some aspects of contemporary U.S. culture from an ecological perspective.
  • assess the contribution of literary texts to the emerging culture of environmental concern.

ENGLT 331 African-American Literature (1730-1930)

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

ENGLT 331 is a study of major African-American authors and their literature from 1730 to 1930. This course includes critical reading of slave narratives, autobiographies, essays, novels, plays, short stories, poetry, and folklore. The course examines the cultural, political, and historical contexts for the readings and the connections between the literature and the experiences that inspired them. Some of the writers studied include Lucy Terry, Jupiter Hammon, Frederick Douglass, Phillis Wheatley, William Wells Brown, Frances Harper, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B Dubois, Charles Chestnutt, Alain Locke, Zora Neale Hurston, and many others. One field trip may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the oral tradition and slavery literature of early African American literature.
  • evaluate the literary contributions of major African American authors from the years 1730-1930.
  • evaluate African American authors and their works.
  • identify and assess literary techniques and terms.
  • interpret African American literature critically and analyze its cultural, sociohistorical, and political frameworks.
  • evaluate African American cultural experiences in light of broader U.S. culture and the effects of racism
  • analyze African American literature's cultural, sociohistorical, and political frameworks, including comparisons to the emerging European-American literary canon.

ENGLT 332 African-American Literature (1930-Present)

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

ENGLT 332 is a study of major African-American authors and their literature from 1930 to the present. This course includes critical reading of essays, novels, plays, short stories, poetry, and folklore. The course also examines the cultural, historical, and political contexts for the literature. Some of the writers studied include Richard Wright, Ann Petry, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Owen Dodson, August Wilson, Rita Dove, J. California Cooper, Bebe Moore Campbell, Mari Evans, Ralph Ellison, Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker and many others. One field trip may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess the literary contributions of major African American authors from 1930 to the present.
  • evaluate African American authors and their works.
  • identify literary techniques and terms.
  • interpret African American literature critically.
  • evaluate African American cultural experiences in light of broader U.S. culture and the effects of racism.
  • analyze African American literature's cultural, sociohistorical, and political frameworks, including comparisons to the emerging European-American literary canon.

ENGLT 334 Asian-American Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D3; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys fiction, drama, poetry, and memoirs written by Asian Americans. The course focuses on works written by Americans of Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese descent but also includes the work of other Pan-Asian American writers. Students explore the ways in which the experience of being Asian in America has shaped the literature and examine the differences and similarities of these experiences across cultures, generations, and genders. Optional field trips may be included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate Asian American literature within its social/historical context.
  • analyze the effects of Asian American writers' cultures on their works.
  • apply critical methods in analyzing Asian American works.
  • create responses that critique Asian American literature in meaningful ways.

ENGLT 335 Latino, Mexican-American, and Chicano Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys U.S. literature (prose, poetry, drama, creative non-fiction) authored by Latino, Mexican-American, and Chicano writers. Emphasizing the historical and cultural roots of this body of literature, the course examines the contested meanings of such concepts as: Latino, Mexican-American, and Chicano identity; the relationship between social/political activism and literary expression; immigration and the border; and gender relations and sexuality within the many Latino communities. Special attention will be paid to literary forms such as the corrido, the testimonio, and the Chicano theater movement. Knowledge of some Spanish is helpful, but not required. Optional field trips may be included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of various Latino, Chicano, and Mexican-American literatures in the U.S.
  • relate Latino culture to literary production.
  • assess and examine Latino literature in social/historical context.
  • evaluate Latino cultural experiences in light of broader U.S. culture and the effects of racism.
  • synthesize ideas and themes from original texts and secondary sources.

ENGLT 345 Mythologies of the World

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course offers a thematic and regional approach to mythology and legend from a variety of cultures, stressing the following types of stories: beginnings of the world, creation of living creatures, explanation of natural phenomena, relationships between gods and mortals, deeds of superhumans, the archetypal hero, and destruction, death, and afterlife.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare the myths and legends of various cultures and time periods.
  • recognize the interrelated nature of human concern with the mythic and divine.
  • illustrate the similarities in myths and legends across different cultures and time periods.
  • evaluate archetypal elements in myths and legends from ancient times to the present.
  • draw connections between literary texts and larger socio-cultural and historical contexts.
  • analyze various literary and critical sources.
  • produce well-written literary and historical analyses.

ENGLT 346 Latin American Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces students to the literature of Latin America. The course is taught in English, and the texts will be read in translation. Beginning with pre-Columbian literature, the course examines the relationship of history and culture to literary production. Literary movements will be studied, for example, the Boom, the New Latin American Cinema, and magical realism. Major authors may include Nobel Prize winners Pablo Neruda, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Rigoberta Menchu, and Octavio Paz. The course may examine both literary texts and films. Knowledge of some Spanish is helpful, but not required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of various Latin American national literatures.
  • relate Latin American culture to literary production.
  • assess and examine Latin American literature in social/historical context.
  • evaluate Latin American literature's relationship to U.S., Native American, and European culture, including imperialism, racism, and neo-colonialism.
  • assess Latin American literature's integral contribution to studies of the literature of the Americas.
  • synthesize ideas and themes from original texts and secondary sources.

ENGLT 360 Women in Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys literature by and/or about women. It emphasizes American and British writers and the multicultural nature of the women's canon. Readings may include literature from any nation, culture, or historical period and focus on a comparative analysis of gender issues. Possible authors include Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Virginia Woolfe, Harriet Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, Sylvia Plath, Flannery O'Conner, Maxine Hong Kingston, Sandra Cisneros, Leslie Marmon Silko, Toni Morrison, Jhumpa Lahiri and others.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the contribution of women writers to the literary tradition.
  • analyze the changing relationship of women writers to culture and society throughout various time periods.
  • recognize the multicultural nature of the women's literary canon.
  • demonstrate an awareness of the complex interaction of gender, race, and class as it is reflected in women's literature.
  • analyze the diverse issues and themes evident in texts written by women.
  • identify the wide range of cultures and ethnic groups that form the body of women's literature.
  • apply feminist literary theory to texts.

ENGLT 365 Introduction to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This class will survey representative literature concerning gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) themes and issues as written by or about GLBT people from ancient times to the present day. The comprehensive literary study includes analysis of significant historical and cultural influences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a basic knowledge of GLBT literature and the cultural and intellectual trends it represents.
  • analyze the literature critically.
  • apply critical thinking skills in class discussion and in written analytical essays.
  • identify the contributions of GLBT writers to mainstream literature and the GLBT subculture.
  • incorporate an awareness of the effects of GLBT literature into textual analysis.
  • compare and contrast GLBT issues at work in literature over the course of several historical periods.
  • evaluate the significance of GLBT writers and topics within a historical framework.
  • synthesize bibliographic research effectively into analytical papers.

ENGLT 370 Children and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a genre-based survey of the best literature, past and present, created for children, and of the criteria for selecting, evaluating, and discussing children’s literature. It includes discussion of the history of children’s poetry, short fiction, long fiction, and drama, and of current issues such as censorship, literacy, and multicultural diversity. This course is intended for prospective teachers, early childhood education (ECE) majors, librarians, and anyone who is or will be in frequent contact with children. It includes reading to children in a formal group situation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify literature available for children in a variety of genres, including poetry, short fiction, longer fiction, and drama.
  • analyze and apply criteria for evaluating children's literature in each of the genres.
  • evaluate principles for selecting children's literature in each of the genres.
  • assess the contribution of outstanding authors, illustrators, and critics of children's literature.
  • recognize the diverse values that literature holds for children.
  • identify the cultural connections literature offers children.

ENGLT 380 Introduction to Shakespeare

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

"All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players." This course will guide the student through interpretation of several of Shakespeare's most popular plays and sonnets by taking a close look at his language, themes, and values to illustrate Shakespeare's relevance in today's world. By bringing their own perspectives to the texts, students will appreciate the vitality and universality of Shakespeare's works.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize and identify primary characters and thematic elements in plays and sonnets of Shakespeare.
  • discuss the role of Elizabethan culture and politics in Shakespearean drama.
  • explicate passages from Shakespeare's plays and sonnets to uncover meaning and guide interpretation.
  • define the major dramatic modes (comedy, tragedy, etc.), relating them to Shakespeare's plays.
  • evaluate Shakespearean texts in terms of both Elizabethan and contemporary theatrical approaches.
  • apply contemporary methods of literary analysis and criticism to the works of Shakespeare.

ENGLT 392 Science Fiction and Fantasy

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:LIBR 318 (<i>Library Research and Information Literacy</i>) with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces students to significant works in science fiction and fantasy literature. Students will explore connections between the literature and concerns about social, ethical, and scientific developments or trends. Authors may include Octavia Butler, William Gibson, Aldous Huxley, Ursula LeGuin, Neal Stephenson, J.R.R. Tolkein, and Kurt Vonnegut.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critically analyze literary Science Fiction and Fantasy texts.
  • compare authors, texts, and themes within Science Fiction and Fantasy.
  • produce well-written literary analyses.
  • draw connections between literary Science Fiction and Fantasy texts and larger social, ethical, or scientific issues.

ENGLT 400 Introduction to Film

  • Same As:TAFILM 300
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300, ESLR 340, and ESLW 340 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course explores the artistic, business, and social elements of modern film. It examines the elements that go into making films: acting, directing, cinematography, writing, and editing. It investigates the techniques used to manipulate the audience into fear, laughter, and sadness and compares the commercial box office hit and "movie star" to enduring artistic films and actors. This class will view and analyze films to evaluate filmmaking techniques and the impact of films and the movie business on society. This course is cross-listed with TAFILM 300. It may be taken only once for credit as TAFILM 300 or as ENGLT 400, but not both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze film as a mode of artistic expression and communication.
  • analyze cinema's place within a framework of modern culture.
  • demonstrate development of aesthetic and perceptual skills to appreciate works of film as explorations of human experience.
  • describe technical, artistic, and theoretical elements of cinema.
  • analyze and evaluate film in terms of aesthetic and critical factors: technical elements, style, form, context, etc.
  • construct criteria for critical approaches to films.
  • demonstrate a critical approach to film through written and oral film critiques and/or projects.

ENGLT 401 Women in Film and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

From its earliest days, Hollywood has played an important role in shaping and reflecting cultural assumptions, myths, and fears. This course examines the underlying messages about race and gender in Hollywood's portrayal of women. The course also compares and contrasts representation of different groups of women, including minority and marginalized, in independent and experimental films. In addition to viewing a variety of film genres, the reading assignments include works of fiction, poetry, and essays from sociology, psychology, and critical theory.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze film and literature and recognize their power to shape reality in both positive and negative ways.
  • identify a variety of film and literature genres and the representation of women within those conventions.
  • construct images of women from an historical perspective – from the times that produced class literature, to the early years of cinema, to World War II, to the women’s movement in the 70’s, to post-feminism.
  • evaluate the historical exclusion and representation of marginalized and/or minority women in film.
  • compare and contrast the depiction of minority and marginalized women in both film and literature.
  • identify and evaluate the ways in which filmmakers “reinterpret” and modify literary works to fit Hollywood myths.

ENGLT 403 Film Adaptations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3A; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the process, pitfalls, and successes of adapting literary, stage, and previous film material into films. The course will discuss faithful and unfaithful adaptations, reading the original texts and viewing the films with an awareness of their historical and cultural contexts. The course analyzes intention, creative distinctions, and the limits and strengths of each medium.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and apply basic terminology from literary studies and film studies.
  • distinguish between the strengths and weaknesses inherent in the genres of short story, novel, drama, and film.
  • analyze differences between genres and between media.
  • construct criteria for judging adaptations.
  • evaluate films based on course concepts.
  • evaluate both literature and film in cultural context, as cultural and artistic expressions of people in their historical and social moments.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the historical context for each work studied.

ENGLT 404 Documentary Film Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 and ENGRD 11 or ESLR 310 and ESLW 310 with grades of "C" or better or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course, students view, discuss, and analyze documentary films. Students will learn about the history of documentary films, viewing several classics. The course develops a vocabulary of film terminology and helps students to be able view documentaries aesthetically as well as for their content. Documentaries are analyzed as artistic expressions that develop out of their historical and cultural contexts. Students will view and discuss foreign language documentaries, contemporary box office hits, and independent film documentaries.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and recognize important documentary films and filmmakers of the past and contemporary documentary filmmakers.
  • analyze films as texts, interpreting and studying the films themselves.
  • classify documentary films according to generally accepted categories.
  • define and apply the basic terminology of film.
  • analyze documentary films both for their artistic expression and for their content.
  • interpret documentary films in their social, historical, and cultural context.
  • research basic information on films and directors.
  • develop aesthetic judgments and understandings of documentary films.

ENGLT 480 World Literature: Antiquity to the Early Modern World - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a comparative study of works that have made important contributions to world literature. Students learn to recognize and explain developmental stages and important themes in representative works written from antiquity to the early modern period and to analyze literary expressions of values, ideas, and multicultural issues typical of major world cultures. An important purpose of the course is to examine significant aspects of culture, social experiences, and contributions of non-western cultures. The class is conducted as a seminar in which students give at least one oral presentation and write a minimum of 6,000 words, including at least one textual analysis and one research paper.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate and compare literary and non-fiction works that have shaped or challenged major world cultures.
  • analyze important works in the context of literary traditions and apply this knowledge to other literary traditions.
  • identify and discuss significant aspects of culture, social experiences, and contributions of non-western cultures.
  • analyze ethnic experience, ethnocentrism, and/or racist or sexist critiques in particular texts.
  • synthesize and cite ideas and themes from original texts and secondary sources.

ENGLT 481 World Literature: Seventeenth Century to Present - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 145
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a comparative study of works that have made important contributions to world literature. Students learn to recognize and explain developmental stages and important themes in representative works written from the seventeenth-century to the present and to analyze literary expressions of values, ideas, and multicultural issues typical of major world cultures. An important purpose of the course is to examine significant aspects of culture, social experiences, and contributions of non-western cultures. The class is conducted as a seminar in which students give at least one oral presentation and write a minimum of 6,000 words, including at least two textual analyses and one research paper.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • make a comparative study of literary and non-fiction works that have shaped or challenged major world cultures.
  • identify and discuss connections among individual cultures.
  • explain important works in the context of literary traditions and apply this knowledge to other literary traditions.
  • identify and discuss significant aspects of culture, social experiences, and contributions of non-western cultures.
  • analyze ethnic experience, ethnocentrism and/or racist or sexist ideas in particular texts.
  • explain the relevance of historical texts for modern readers.
  • synthesize ideas and themes from original texts and secondary sources.
  • evaluate and interpret extensive research on a topic leading to an oral presentation and a research paper.

ENGLT 494 Topics in Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is scheduled as needed under a title describing specific content. Students study the works of a significant writer or group of writers or of work on one theme, region, vocation, or human experience. Possible titles: Death in Literature, The Literature of the Occult, The Hero in Fiction, The Love Story, The Literature of War. This course is not recommended as a substitute for genre or survey courses. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine and compare works studied according to theme, author's style, or genre.
  • compose essays and other writings that respond to, evaluate, and analyze literary works.
  • analyze the use and effect of literary devices in a variety of works.
  • assess poetry, prose, fiction, or drama as a reflection of the authors' culture and values.

ENGLT 495 Independent Studies in Literature

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Independent study allows a student or small group of students to work directly with an instructor independent from a structured class or course. The instructor and student(s) typically develop a contract together, outlining the course of study. Variable units enable maximum flexibility in creating this course of study. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss and analyze the literature of the authors, genre, culture, or time period under study.
  • demonstrate an understanding of literature of the authors, genre, culture, or time period under study
  • develop and pursue a research agenda on an literary topic or set of literary topics.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of the independent study project to the broader discipline.

ENGLT 499 Experimental Offering in Literature

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


English - Reading (ENGRD) Courses

ENGRD 10 Basic Reading Skill Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ENGLB 55
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides competency-based instruction for improving literal comprehension, vocabulary development, and dictionary skills.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • build a vocabulary base.
  • employ vocabulary development techniques and strategies such as context clues, dictionary skills, and vocabulary study skills.
  • identify stated main ideas in paragraphs.
  • identify major and minor supporting details in paragraphs.
  • develop beginning inferential skills in determining implied main ideas in paragraphs.
  • recognize patterns of organization in nonfiction texts.

ENGRD 11 Reading Skill Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 10 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:ENGLB 55
  • Advisory:ENGWR 51 with a "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides competency and strategy-based instruction for improving skills basic to all reading. It involves intensive work with literal comprehension, beginning inferential comprehension, vocabulary development, and study skills, including practice with various kinds of reading materials. Completion of ENGLB 55 may be recommended by the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • expand his/her vocabulary base and employ vocabulary development techniques.
  • identify stated main ideas in paragraphs.
  • determine implied main ideas in paragraphs.
  • identify major and minor details in paragraphs.
  • make accurate inferences and draw logical conclusions in nonfiction texts.
  • recognize and differentiate patterns of organization in paragraphs and short articles.
  • distinguish between fact and opinion in nonfiction texts.
  • evaluate an author's purpose and tone in various nonfiction texts.
  • identify an author's stated thesis in a multi-paragraph text.
  • demonstrate comprehension of fiction at literal and inferential levels.
  • modify study skills appropriately for the given reading task.

ENGRD 110 Comprehension Strategies and Vocabulary Development For College

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 11 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:ENGLB 55
  • Advisory:ENGWR 51 with a grade of 'C' or better.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to develop efficient reading skills and strategies required of community college students. Areas of concentration include vocabulary development, literal and inferential comprehension skills, and study strategies for reading a variety of college-level texts: fiction and non-fiction essays and articles, novels, and textbooks. ENGLB 55 may be recommended by the instructor for students who need more reading skill practice.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • understand and utilize vocabulary required for comprehending texts.
  • identify, explain, and analyze the stated main idea of a reading selection.
  • understand and interpret the implied main idea of a reading selection.
  • identify, explain, and analyze the supporting details of a reading selection.
  • understand and interpret inferences required for comprehending texts.
  • identify, explain, and analyze the stated thesis in a longer reading selection.
  • apply reading comprehension skills to articulate a thesis paraphrase of a longer reading selection.
  • recognize and explain patterns of organization typically found in college-level texts.
  • identify, explain, and analyze facts and opinions of a reading selection.
  • recognize and interpret the author’s purpose and tone of a reading selection.
  • employ a variety of study skills (mapping, paraphrasing, outlining, annotating, etc.) required for understanding college-level texts.

ENGRD 118 Accelerated College Reading

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 11 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:ENGRD 310
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides intensive instruction and practice in critical reading and thinking skills necessary for success in ENGRD 310. Reading assignments are connected to assignments in ENGRD 310, so that the student might succeed at that course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • understand and employ vocabulary required for comprehending college-level texts.
  • review, identify, and explain the stated main idea of a reading selection.
  • understand and interpret the implied main idea of a reading selection.
  • identify, explain, and analyze the supporting details of a reading selection.
  • paraphrase the thesis of a longer reading selection.
  • recognize and explain patterns of organization typically found in college-level texts.
  • identify, explain, and analyze facts and opinions in a reading selection.
  • recognize and interpret the author’s purpose and tone in a reading selection.
  • employ a variety of study skills (e.g., mapping, paraphrasing, outlining, annotating, etc.) required for understanding college-level texts.
  • practice critical reading to determine propaganda techniques and logical fallacies.

ENGRD 208 Reading for Academic Achievement

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 or ESLR 320 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:This course is not open to students who have already completed ENGRD 310: Critical Reading as Critical Thinking or ENGRD 312: Academic Textbook Reading.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the theory and practice of analytical and speed reading skills and strategies required for proficient and effective reading of college level materials. The class focuses on the following: scaffolding of proficient comprehension skills; analytical evaluation of college level essays; critical reading skills for college level textbooks; using critical reading and thinking skills when reading on the Internet and doing research; vocabulary development; building of a flexible reading rate. These skills will be developed through application in varied reading materials. One or more additional hours in the Reading Lab may be recommended. This course is not open to students who have completed ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze essays or other printed material as well as electronic materials and apply such analytical reasoning skills as recognizing organizational patterns.
  • evaluate use of support, and assess relevancy and adequacy of information.
  • evaluate college level reading materials, demonstrating various individual reading skills such as making inferences and interpreting figurative language.
  • utilize college level vocabulary.
  • apply effective and efficient reading rates for college level materials and use flexibility in assessing an appropriate reading speed for varied materials.
  • demonstrate college level reading skills in textbook reading, applying textbook reading and note-taking skills to college level textbooks from various disciplines.
  • evaluate use of support, and assess relevancy and adequacy of information.
  • distinguish between fact and opinion, making judgments, evaluating for tone and bias, assessing an author's purpose, and recognizing errors in argument, including logical fallacies.
  • write an accurate thesis paraphrase.
  • summarize a college-level text.

ENGRD 299 Experimental Offering in English - Reading

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


ENGRD 310 Critical Reading as Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 51 and LIBR 318 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the theory and practice of advanced critical reading skills and strategies needed for college-level texts with emphasis on the following: critical and analytical evaluation of printed material, vocabulary development, proficient comprehension skills, development of efficient and flexible reading, and application in textbook and nonfiction reading. One or more additional hours per week in the Reading Lab may be recommended.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate proficiency as an effective reader using a variety of skills, including knowledge of advanced vocabulary, a flexible reading rate, and comprehension of advanced texts.
  • analyze any text with critical judgment and analytical thinking skills.
  • analyze an author's purpose, tone, bias, and point of view in college-level texts.
  • evaluate the logic of arguments.
  • interpret inferences.
  • compose a thesis paraphrase.
  • summarize a text succinctly.
  • identify and distinguish between patterns of organization and rhetorical modes.
  • interpret figurative language.
  • recognize and distinguish different types of logical fallacies, propaganda techniques, and emotional appeals.

ENGRD 312 Academic Textbook Reading

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 110 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to refine students' ability to read, understand, and respond to textbooks in vocational courses such as nursing, aeronautics, and cosmetology, as well as in transfer-level courses such as business, geology, and psychology. Activities emphasize discipline-based vocabulary; reading strategies; critical thinking; interpretation of figures, facts, and data; and reading rates as they relate to academic success. Students may be recommended by the instructor to complete ENGLB 55.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • choose appropriate study skills for various content-area courses including previewing, annotating, paraphrasing, and reviewing.
  • evaluate purpose and structure in college textbooks.
  • compose written responses to textbook readings.
  • employ college-level, discipline-based vocabulary learning strategies.
  • analyze and apply appropriate reading rates to college material.
  • outline, summarize, and respond to textbook chapters and topics.

ENGRD 315 Reading Across the Disciplines for Content Courses

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Another transfer-level content-area course
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course offers reading skills to students as they apply to various content-area courses. Topics include the principles of the reading process, analysis of discipline-specific reading assignments, strategies for retention, and research strategies particular to the chosen discipline. Students should come to the Reading
Across the Disciplines (RAD) Center and meet with a RAD staff member before enrolling. This course is graded Pass/No Pass.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze lectures, readings, assignments, and handouts to meet course requirements.
  • synthesize materials from lectures and reading assignments to create appropriate study tools.
  • assess the reading process and materials to employ appropriate critical reading strategies.
  • identify the purpose for reading.
  • choose reading rate and style based on purpose and material.
  • utilize college-level, discipline-based vocabulary.
  • develop and employ reading strategies for research.

ENGRD 495 Independent Studies in English - Reading

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Independent study allows a student or small group of students to work directly with an instructor independent from a structured class or course. The instructor and student(s) typically develop a contract together, outlining the course of study. Variable units enable maximum flexibility in creating this course of study.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate competence in the skills essential to mastery of the major discipline of study that are necessary to accomplish the independent study.
  • discuss and outline a proposal of study (that can be accomplished within one semester term) with a supervising instructor qualified within the discipline.
  • prepare a written and/or oral report summarizing the results achieved from the independent study.

ENGRD 499 Experimental Offering in English - Reading

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


English - Writing (ENGWR) Courses

ENGWR 51 Developmental Writing

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course focuses on basic writing skills, emphasizing the connection between writing and reading. It offers individualized and group instruction for students who need to improve their ability to write increasingly complex and varied short essays. Each student writes a minimum of 4,000 words divided into at least five essays (at least three of which will be written entirely in class and some of which may be in response to readings). The course includes principles of basic grammar, effective sentence structure, paragraph development, and analysis of and response to reading. Students will read at least one book-length work. Formerly known as ENGWR 50.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the principles of grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation and apply these in written assignments.
  • demonstrate correct and varied sentence structure.
  • summarize and evaluate readings.
  • write competent paragraphs and essays in response to assigned readings.
  • employ critical thinking skills at the sentence, paragraph, and essay levels.
  • detect weaknesses or errors in his/her own writing.

ENGWR 52 Developmental Writing Workshop

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ENGWR 51
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This basic writing course is designed for students who need intensive instruction in how to write, revise, and edit drafts. Students will write a minimum total of 1,500 words divided among at least six assignments. The course includes principles of basic grammar, spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and sentence structure. This course is graded Pass/No Pass.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • write short, organized essays.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the principles of basic grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation.
  • compose clear, correct sentences.
  • revise and edit drafts.

ENGWR 90 Preparation for English Writing - Success Academy

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement through the assessment process
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides an introduction to student learning expectations and the outcomes of higher education. This course has a specific focus on English writing preparation through the implementation of individualized group instruction for students.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate increased readiness for the students' upcoming English Writing course.
  • identify areas of further development of skills that will need more focus in the upcoming English Writing course.
  • identify an awareness of resources to help with success in the upcoming English Writing course.

ENGWR 101 College Writing

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGLB 55 with a grade of "P" and ENGRD 110 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This writing course uses individual and group instruction to help students improve critical thinking and writing skills. Students will be assigned a minimum of 6,000 words including at least two in-class midterms and a departmental final exam. Writing assignments are often based on analysis of readings. The course prepares students for college composition. Formerly known as ENGWR 100.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose fully developed, structured, and unified essays.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the writing process through pre-writing, drafting, and revision.
  • support opinions and conclusions using appropriate evidence.
  • demonstrate ability to use varied sentence structures and types.
  • construct sentences with precise and appropriate words.
  • examine and evaluate writing for errors.
  • apply critical reading and reasoning skills.
  • analyze and respond to readings and incorporate the ideas of others into writing.
  • summarize short articles accurately and correctly.
  • demonstrate competence in basic MLA formatting and in-text citing.

ENGWR 108 Accelerated College Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:ENGWR 300
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides intensive instruction and practice in the critical thinking and writing skills necessary for success in college composition. Writing assignments are often connected to the students' assignments in ENGWR 300. The course includes the drafting, revision, and editing processes as well as instruction in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • employ a recursive writing process that includes pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing.
  • compose fully developed, structured, coherent, and unified essays.
  • identify and correct sentence errors (especially sentence fragments, comma-splices and run-on sentences, subject-verb disagreement, incorrect verb tense and form, punctuation, pronoun reference and agreement, and capitalization).
  • summarize, analyze, and respond to readings.
  • incorporate the ideas of others into writing and demonstrate competence in MLA formatting and in-text citing.

ENGWR 110 College Reading and Writing Skills

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ENGLB 55
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This pre-transfer-level course is designed to prepare students for success in ENGWR 300 and other courses that require writing. Students will read primarily transfer-level non-fiction texts of varying length, and write essays responding to and incorporating these readings. The course will focus on reading and writing fundamentals, such as active reading strategies, writing process, thesis development, paragraph structure, logical support, and sentence awareness. A half-unit Reading and Writing Lab (ENGLB 55) is also required to provide more individualized support.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate comprehension of article or book-length works at the literal and inferential levels.
  • modify active reading strategies appropriately for a given reading task.
  • utilize pre-writing and revision strategies to write competent, college-appropriate essays in response to assigned readings.
  • incorporate readings into writing through the use of summary, quoting, and paraphrase.
  • utilize the principles of grammar, spelling, capitalization, and punctuation and apply these in written assignments.

ENGWR 157 University Preparatory Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This writing course uses individual and group instruction to help students improve critical thinking and writing skills. Each student writes 6,000 words (approximately five to six essays), including at least two in-class essays and one in-class final exam. Writing assignments are largely based on analysis of readings. This course prepares students for university-level writing courses.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose fully developed, structured, and unified essays, support main points using appropriate evidence, and demonstrate knowledge of the writing process through pre-writing, drafting, and revision.
  • apply critical reading and reasoning skills through analyzing and responding to readings and incorporating the ideas of others into his or her own writing.
  • demonstrate ability to use varied sentence structures and types by constructing sentences with precise and appropriate words.

ENGWR 299 Experimental Offering in English - Writing

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


ENGWR 300 College Composition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 110 or ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, concurrent enrollment in ENGWR 108, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310 and LIBR 318 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A2; IGETC Area 1A
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This writing course emphasizes reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that are essential for successful completion of a four-year college program. Students write a minimum of 6,500 words divided among 6-8 essays, including at least one research paper and one in-class essay. This course satisfies the writing competency requirement for graduation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose effective college-level essays using a variety of rhetorical strategies and applying appropriate citations and formatting standards.
  • research, evaluate, critically analyze, and synthesize complex works to support a thesis.
  • apply the conventions of standard written English, employing a variety of sentence structures and college-level diction.

ENGWR 301 College Composition and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

ENGWR 301 is an introduction to critical thinking and writing about works in the four major genres of literature: poetry, drama, short story, and novel. In the course, students: 1) further their study and practice in analytical reading and writing; 2) cover principles of logic such as inductive and deductive reasoning, recognizing logical fallacies, and suspending judgment; 3) learn to apply the conventions of literary criticism and to analyze, interpret, and explicate literary works. Students are required to write a minimum of 6,000 words presenting reasoned arguments of literary texts.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze literature through various critical approaches.
  • evaluate works of literature by applying literary elements, terms, and theoretical concepts.
  • compare and contrast artistic and literary movements across a range of time periods as well as the connections between major literary works.
  • think and write critically about literary works in a variety of poetic and narrative forms from several periods and various cultures.
  • identify premises, both explicitly and implicitly stated.
  • distinguish among facts, inferences, assumptions, and implications.
  • recognize fallacious reasoning, including but not limited to the standard critical thinking fallacies, in various critical interpretations of literary works (including the students' own interpretations) and respond to (and correct, if necessary) these fallacies.
  • formulate interpretations, conclusions, and judgments based on inferences.
  • reason inductively from themes, patterns, and structures to form generalizations.
  • reason deductively by recognizing literary and linguistic conventions, whether structural, semantic, or syntactical and draw conclusions about texts based on those conventions.
  • assess a variety of perspectives before formulating conclusions.
  • propose an argument of interpretation or evaluation (thesis).
  • support the thesis with a sufficient number and variety of appropriate examples taking into account alternate and opposing points of view.
  • incorporate supporting detail from secondary texts.
  • construct logical discourse through order, repetition, and transitional devices.
  • use diction appropriate to the audience and the rhetorical purpose of writing.
  • use elements of style with increasing complexity (such as absolute phrases or repetition) to achieve coherence.
  • demonstrate a knowledge of the four major literary genres (poetry, novel, short story, and drama) including developments and variations within these genres over time.

ENGWR 302 Advanced Composition and Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 488 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:LIBR 318
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 105
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course develops composition skills at the advanced level as well as analytical skills through writing, reading, and discussion. It examines methods by which people are persuaded to think, believe, and/or act. It also includes analyzing arguments or expressions of opinions for their validity and soundness and evaluating outside sources. Finally, it focuses on critically assessing, developing, supporting, and effectively expressing opinions on issues. It emphasizes thinking clearly and organizing thought carefully in writing by using principles of logic. This course includes writing a minimum of 6,500 words.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create well supported, well developed arguments and analyses.
  • evaluate various types of arguments, including identifying faulty reasoning and other forms of weak argumentation.
  • assess and synthesize online and library database research for use in written and oral arguments.

ENGWR 303 Argumentative Writing and Critical Thinking Through Literature

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 488 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (302 and 303 combined: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); AA/AS Area II(a); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 110; C-ID ENGL 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Through the study of complex literary works in all major genres, this course offers instruction in analytical, critical, and argumentative writing; critical thinking; research strategies; information literacy; and proper documentation. Close reading skills and the aesthetic qualities of literature are also studied. A minimum of 6,000 words of formal writing will be required. Attendance at readings, plays, or films may be required. Online students have the option of watching these online.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and interpret literary texts with emphasis on literary devices and key elements of major genres.
  • evaluate various types of arguments, including identifying faulty reasoning and other forms of weak argumentation.
  • compose thesis-driven arguments that suit a variety of rhetorical situations (including literary), effectively synthesize sources, and use MLA documentation.

ENGWR 330 Writing for Publication

  • Same As:JOUR 340
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is an introductory course in writing nonfiction for publication. Emphasis will be on developing a saleable article for magazines, newspapers, or online media sources; finding ideas; analyzing publications; writing a query letter; researching and interviewing; and organizing, writing, and illustrating an article. Credit may be awarded for ENGWR 330 or JOUR 340, but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate writing and marketing skills to successfully write magazine articles and find the most appropriate print or online publications to market them.
  • demonstrate ideas with a focus and slant toward a particular print or online publication.
  • research sources and develop interview techniques.
  • write and edit salable articles for print or online publications.
  • analyze both print and online publications for appropriateness and timeliness of proposed articles.

ENGWR 384 Mass Media and Society

  • Same As:COMM 351 and JOUR 310
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 51 or ESLW 310 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 through the assessment process
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 or ESLW 320 with a "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D4; IGETC Area 4G
  • C-ID:C-ID JOUR 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is an interdisciplinary course exploring aspects of communication and the impact of mass media on the individual and society. The survey includes basic communication models, books, magazines, newspapers, recordings, movies, radio, television, advertising, public relations, the Internet, theories of communication, relationships between mass media and business and government, and processes and effects from a social science perspective. Credit may be awarded for only one section of either COMM 351, ENGWR 384, or JOUR 310.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the basic principles of each form of basic communication.
  • demonstrate an understanding of mass media and its relationship to the public.
  • differentiate among news, opinion, feature writing, and electronic presentations.
  • analyze and evaluate each form of media.
  • assess the impact of media messages on various audiences.

ENGWR 482 Honors Advanced Composition and Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 488 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 105
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

ENGWR 482 is a course in critical reasoning, reading, and writing requiring a high level of competence in English composition. Students will read, discuss, and analyze complex texts (essay and book-length works) reflecting a variety of cultural, historical, and philosophical perspectives. The course includes inductive and deductive reasoning, analysis of fallacious reasoning, and use of persuasive language. The minimum word requirement of 6,500 words will be divided among at least four formal essays, ranging from 1,000-3,000 words each, two of which will include primary and secondary research and MLA format. This course is taught as a seminar; several group and individual class presentations will be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate arguments and rhetorical strategies and identify logical fallacies in professional and student writing.
  • summarize and paraphrase accurately texts of various lengths.
  • analyze evidence (facts, statistics, various research) and assess its credibility and accuracy.
  • formulate appropriate and effective rhetorical strategies in oral and written presentations.
  • create arguments that integrate a variety of texts, properly document support, and demonstrate a sophisticated style and vocabulary reflecting advanced critical thinking skills.

ENGWR 488 Honors College Composition and Research

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must also be eligible for admission to the Honors Program.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A2; IGETC Area 1A
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course offers the honors student a challenging curriculum that will develop skills in composition, critical thinking, and research. Students write a minimum of 6,500 words divided among at least four to six essays, including a significant research paper and at least one in-class essay. In addition to research assignments, students will read at least one full-length, supplemental text. In order to fulfill the honors requirement, students will complete a significant project and/or classroom presentation. This course was formerly known as ENGWR 480. This course is taught as a seminar; several group and individual class presentations/projects will be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose transfer level essays that demonstrate competency in organization, development, and unity.
  • synthesize multiple outside sources into original essays, demonstrating college competence in critical reading and analysis.
  • research using library and online sources and effectively incorporate research into essays.
  • exhibit mastery of the conventions of Modern Language Association citations and documentation.
  • demonstrate competency in grammar and usage in the writing of transfer level compositions.
  • lead in-class discussions and create a significant classroom presentation.

ENGWR 495 Independent Studies in English - Writing

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Independent study allows a student or small group of students to work directly with an instructor independent of a structured class or course. The instructor and student(s) typically develop a contract together, outlining the course of study. Variable units enable maximum flexibility in creating this course of study. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate improved writing skills

ENGWR 499 Experimental Offering in English - Writing

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020