History

History (HIST) Courses

HIST 300 History of Western Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 170
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is a study of Western Civilization from pre-historic times to the Reformation. The focus of the course will be on the history of Europe, including a general account of those political, economic, and social institutions as well as the cultural and intellectual forces that have contributed to the making of European societies. The course will examine prehistorical culture, the Ancient Near East, Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Reformation. Students should expect to write a minimum of 3,000 words.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in the history of Western Civilization from pre-historic times to the Renaissance. (ProLO 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about the history of Western Civilization, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLO 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in the history of Western Civilization through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLO 1)
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLOs 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex historical material. (ProLOs 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 302 History of Western Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is a study of Western Civilization from the Renaissance to the present. The course will focus on the political, economic, social, cultural, and intellectual forces that have contributed to the making of modern European societies. Students should expect to write a minimum of 3,000 words.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in the history of Western Civilization from the Renaissance to the present. (ProLO 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about the history of Western Civilization, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLO 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in the history of Western Civilization through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLO 1)
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLOs 2, 3, and 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLOs 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 307 History of World Civilizations to 1500

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys world history to 1500 with an emphasis on the dynamic interaction of cultures and peoples. The course will emphasize the role of social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces as they shape the major world civilizations. It will also focus on the legacy of these civilizations and their contributions to our present cultures.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate breadth of knowledge of important social, economic, cultural, political, and intellectual currents in World History while recognizing the continuum between the past and the present. (Chronology)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in World History through an examination of various historical sources. (Diversity)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about the past, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and in writing. (Historical Thinking)
  • demonstrate an understanding of distinct local, regional, and global experiences and their interconnectedness to engage responsibly in the world. (Citizenship)

HIST 308 History of World Civilizations, 1500 to Present

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a survey of world history from 1500 to the present with an emphasis on the dynamic interaction of cultures and peoples. The focus is on the role played by social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces in shaping the major world civilizations, the legacies of these civilizations, and the on-going tension between tradition and modernity.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate breadth of knowledge of important social, economic, cultural, political, and intellectual currents in World History while recognizing the continuum between the past and the present. (Chronology)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in World History through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (Diversity)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about the past, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and in writing. (Historical Thinking)
  • demonstrate an understanding of distinct local, regional, and global experiences and their interconnectedness to engage responsibly in the world. (Citizenship)

HIST 309 World History in the Twentieth Century

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the major historical developments of the 20th Century world: nationalist and revolutionary movements; the development of modern capitalist, communist, and fascist systems; the dynamics of modern colonialism; postcolonial issues; ethnic conflict; environmental challenges; the emergence of new global systems, and the significance of new communication technologies for political movements and nation-states.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate breadth of knowledge of important social, economic, cultural, political, and intellectual currents in World History while recognizing the continuum between the past and the present. (Chronology)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in World History through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (Diversity)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about the past, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and in writing. (Historical Thinking)
  • demonstrate an understanding of distinct local, regional, and global experiences and their interconnectedness to engage responsibly in the world. (Citizenship)

HIST 310 History of the United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F2; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys the history of the United States by examining its Native American, European, and African backgrounds beginning with pre-historic migrations of America's first inhabitants through the end of Reconstruction in 1877. This course emphasizes the roles played by cultural, economic, intellectual, political, and social institutions in American history, with an eye toward understanding the history of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative framework. Credit may be earned for History 310 or History 483, but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history through Reconstruction. (ProLo 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct oral and written historical arguments. (ProLo 3)
  • evaluate and analyze the diverse experiences and perspectives of multiple ethnic groups in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLo 1)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness between United States and global history to foster active civic engagement. (ProLo 2)
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLos 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 311 History of the United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the development of American Institutions and society from Reconstruction to the present and partially fulfills American Institutions requirements for California State University and the University of California. The course emphasizes the role played by political, economic, social, cultural, and intellectual forces on the culture and development of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative format. HIST 484 is the "honors" equivalent of HIST 311. Students eligible for the Honors Program may elect to take HIST 484 instead of History 311. Because of the close similarity of the courses credit may be earned for HIST 311 or for HIST 484 but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history from 1865 to the present. (ProLO 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLO 3)
  • evaluate and analyze the diverse experiences and perspectives of multiple ethnic groups in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLO 1)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the inter-connectedness between United States history and global history to foster active civic engagement. (ProLo 2)
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLOs 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret historical material. (ProLOs 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 314 Recent United States History

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers United States history from 1945 to the present, offering an in-depth study of post-World War II United States history. The course emphasizes the role played by political, economic, social, cultural, and intellectual forces in shaping the American past and leading to present society. A major focus is the culture and development of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative format. Credit may be earned for HIST 314 or HIST 485, but not both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history since 1945 (ProLo 4).
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing (ProLo 3).
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances (ProLo 1).
  • demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness between United States history and global history to foster active citizenship (ProLos 1, 2).
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues (ProLos 2, 3, 4).
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4).

HIST 320 History of the United States: African-American Emphasis

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F2; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the development of American Institutions and society through Reconstruction and fulfills American Institutions requirements for California State University and the University of California. The course emphasizes the role played by political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces in American society and the development of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative format. Beginning on the African Continent, this course will also examine the origins of the Atlantic Slave Trade and its implications for North American labor systems, including slavery. The course pays particular attention to the ways in which black people have influenced the formation and development of this nation; and examines the ways in which racial issues have shaped American society, culture, and politics. Credit may be earned for HIST 320 or HIST 486, but not both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history through Reconstruction. (ProLo 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLo 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLo 1)
  • explain the interconnectedness between United States history and global history to foster active civic engagement.
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLos 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 321 History of the United States: African-American Emphasis

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F2; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the development of American Institutions and society from Reconstruction to the present and partially fulfills American Institutions requirements for California State University and the University of California. The course emphasizes the role played by political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces in American society and the development of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative format. Beginning with a review of the Civil War, HIST 321 closely examines the Reconstruction Era, the societal "place" of African Americans, the development of "Jim Crow" segregation, and the subsequent legal demise of segregation in American life. This course pays close attention to the ways in which African American people have subsequently shaped and contributed to American society, culture, and politics. Credit may be earned for HIST 321 or HIST 487, but not both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history from 1865 to the present. (ProLo 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLo 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLo 1)
  • explain the interconnectedness between United States history and global history to foster active civic engagement.
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLos 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 327 History of the Chicano/Mexican American

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (effective Summer 2020)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2 (effective Fall 2020); CSU Area D (effective Fall 2020); IGETC Area 3B (effective Fall 2020); IGETC Area 4 (effective Fall 2020)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the history of Chicanos/Mexican Americans in North America. It explores pre-Columbian civilizations and the experiences of Chicanos/Mexican Americans within the United States from the colonial period to the present. This course investigates the social, political, economic, legal, and cultural experiences of Chicanos/Mexican Americans and their contributions to American institutions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history as experienced by Chicanos/Mexican Americans. (ProLo 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about Chicanos/Mexican Americans in U.S. history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct oral and written historical arguments. (ProLo 3)
  • evaluate and analyze the diverse experiences and perspectives of Chicanos/Mexican Americans in relation to multiple ethnic groups in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLo 1)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness between the United States, Mexican, and global history to foster active civic engagement. (ProLo 2)
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLos 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 344 Survey of California History: A Multicultural Perspective

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a survey of the history of California with an emphasis on the evolution of the state as a multicultural society, beginning with Native Californian cultures prior to contact with Europeans and continuing to the present. Above all, the course examines, compares, and evaluates the historical experiences of Native Californian, Spanish, Mexican, Asian, African American, European American, and other cultural groups and the role the dynamic interaction of those groups has played in creating contemporary realities in California. Field trips to local sites of historical significance may be included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in California history. (ProLo 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLo 3)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the inter-connectedness between California history, US history, and global history to foster active citizenship. (ProLo 2)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret historical material. (ProLOs 1,2, 3, 4)
  • evaluate and analyze the diverse experiences and perspectives of multiple ethnic groups in California history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLO 1)
  • identify and analyze the historical origins and evolution of California’s multicultural society. (ProLOs 1, 2)
  • identify and analyze the contributions of diverse cultural groups to the historical evolution of California society. (ProLOs 1,2)
  • examine the origins and development of California's constitution, including the constitutional revision in 1878, and Progressive Era reforms in the early 20th century (especially the nonpartisan ballot, and the initiative, referendum, and recall process). (ProLOs 2, 4)

HIST 360 History of African Civilizations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introductory survey of African history from prehistory to the present. Major topics will include the rise of societies and states in Africa to 1500 CE, the introduction of Christianity and Islam, the Atlantic slave trade, European colonialism, and the emergence of nation states in modern Africa. The course examines the development of social, political, and economic institutions in Africa, the interactions of peoples and cultures, and Africa's place in global history.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate breadth of knowledge of the major historical events and forces in African History. (ProLo 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about the African past, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and in writing. (ProLo 3)
  • incorporate and synthesize an understanding of indigenous political, social, and religious institutions in the study of African history. (ProLos 1 and 4)
  • assess and analyze African participation and engagement in global trends and developments as well as the impact of outside influences on Africa. (ProLo 2)
  • evaluate and analyze the importance of the diversity of experience and perspectives in African History with an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLo 1)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the connection between the African past and the African present to engage responsibly in the world. (ProLo 2)

HIST 364 Asian Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys Asian civilizations to 1600 with an emphasis on East Asia and South Asia. The course focuses on the major social, cultural, economic, and political transformations of Asia, particularly highlighting the influence of these peoples and states on each other and the world. The course will provide students with a historical understanding of topics such as: the rise of complex societies, states, and empires across Asia; the relationship between settlement-based civilizations and the herding civilizations of Central Asia; the emergence of various philosophies, religions, and identities across Asia; Asian technology and innovations; the impact of the Mongol Empire; and the changing relationship of Asia to the wider world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate breadth of knowledge of important social, economic, cultural, political, and intellectual currents in Asian history through 1600. (ProLO 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about Asian history through 1600, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and in writing. (ProLO 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in Asian history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLO 1)
  • assess and analyze the history of Asian participation and engagement in global trends and developments as well as the impact of outside influences on Asian history through 1600. (ProLOs 1,2)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the connection between the Asian past and the Asian present to engage responsibly in the world. (ProLO 2, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLOs 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 365 Asian Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys Asian civilizations from 1600 with an emphasis on East Asia and South Asia. The course focuses on the major social, cultural, economic, and political transformations of Asia since 1600, particularly highlighting the influence of these peoples and states on each other and the world. The course will provide students with a historical understanding of topics such as: internal and external pressures on Asian states and peoples, such as European and U.S. imperialism; the rise and transformation of Asian nationalisms and nationalist movements; the impact of modern wars and revolutions on Asia; and the relationship between Asia and the wider world from 1600 to the present.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate breadth of knowledge of important social, economic, cultural, political, and intellectual currents in Asian history since 1600. (ProLO 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about Asian history since 1600, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and in writing. (ProLO 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in Asian history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLO 1)
  • assess and analyze the history of Asian participation and engagement in global trends and developments as well as the impact of outside influences on Asian history since 1600.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the connection between the Asian past and the Asian present to engage responsibly in the world. (ProLOs 2, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLOs 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 373 History of Mexico

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This general survey of Mexican history introduces the cultural, economic, political, and social factors that have shaped Mexico from the pre-Columbian era to the present. Topics of study include pre-Columbian civilizations such as the Olmecs, Maya, and Aztecs and their cultural contributions through architecture and fine arts, the Spanish conquest, colonial New Spain, race, class, and gender in Mexican society, wars of independence and nation building, foreign invasions by the United States and France, the age of Porfirio Diaz, the Revolution of 1910, the modernization of Mexico, and U.S.-Mexico relations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in Mexican history from the pre-Columbian era to the present. (ProLo 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about Mexican history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct oral and written historical arguments. (ProLo 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in Mexican history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLo 1)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness between Mexican, continental, and global history to foster active civic engagement. (ProLo 2)
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLos 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 375 The History of Modern Latin America and Caribbean

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course offers a general survey of Latin America and Caribbean history from the 19th century to the present, with focus on social, political, economic, and cultural developments. Course themes include the complex and gradual process of nation building, the region's incorporation into the global economy, the impact this has had on development and consequential nationalistic re-assertions, the way in which notions of race, class, and gender have informed these processes; the politics of populism, revolution, dictatorship and democracy; and the complex relationship Latin America and the Caribbean share with the United States.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in Latin America and Caribbean history since Independence (ProLo 4).
  • generate significant open-ended questions about Latin America and Caribbean history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing (ProLo 3).
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in Latin America and Caribbean history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances (ProLo 1).
  • analyze Latin America and Caribbean societies in a comparative context to understand the historical construction of differences and similarities (e.g. race, class, gender, etc.) among groups and regions (ProLos 1, 2).
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues (ProLos 2, 3, 4).
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4).

HIST 380 History of the Middle East

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys the history of the Middle East (Southwest Asia) and North Africa with emphasis on the period from the 6th century CE (AD) to the present. The course focuses on the major social, economic, political, and cultural transformations of the region, while taking into account both regional and global contexts of interaction and change in a comparative format. This course will provide students with a historical understanding of the impact of European colonialism, the discovery of petroleum and its consequences, the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, and the role played by the United States in the region.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate breadth of knowledge of important social, economic, cultural, political, and intellectual currents in the History of Southwest Asia and North Africa (SWANA) from later antiquity to the present. (ProLO 1)
  • analyze the history and society of SWANA in a comparative context, understand the historical construction of differences and similarities among groups and regions (e.g. race, class, gender, nation and ethnicity), and recognize the contributions and interactions of such groups to SWANA history. (ProLO 2)
  • generate meaningful open-ended questions about the SWANA past and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and in writing, employing critical thinking skills that include comparative analysis. (ProLO 3)
  • compare, examine, and understand the historical interactions of people in SWANA with peoples and cultures in other parts of Africa, Asia, and Europe through global trade and communication networks, and demonstrate an understanding of distinct local, regional, and global experiences and their interconnectedness in order to engage responsibly in the world. (ProLO 4)
  • examine the role of the global economy, natural resources, and geopolitical considerations on the development of the modern SWANA region and its peoples. (ProLOs 1, 2, 3, &4)

HIST 381 Modern Palestinian History and Culture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to modern Palestinian history and culture. After establishing the ancient historical context of Palestine at the crossroads of Asia, Africa, and the Mediterranean and as an early center of agriculture and civilization, this course focuses mainly on 16th century Ottoman rule to the present. The course covers the impacts of Ottoman rule, the pressures of British and French imperialism, the British Mandate over Palestine, the establishment of the state of Israel, and current Palestinian realities. Palestine's social and cultural diversity, as well as its place in the imagination of people and movements outside the region, is an important part of its history.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate breadth of knowledge of important social, economic, cultural, political, and intellectual currents in modern Palestinian history and culture while recognizing the continuum between past and present. (ProLO 1)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in modern Palestinian history and culture through an examination of a variety of sources and experiences, including conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLO 2)
  • generate meaningful open-ended questions about the Palestinian past, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and in writing, and recognize the contested nature of historical narratives. (ProLO 3)
  • recognize the various contending and conflicting regional and global forces on Palestinian society and demonstrate their connections to local, national, and regional developments, and compare Palestinian experiences of those forces with those of other groups in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. (ProLO 4)
  • examine the role of Palestinian history and culture in its local, regional, and global contexts, including points of contact or interconnectedness with social justice struggles which call for engaging responsibly in the world. (ProLO 4)

HIST 483 History of the United States - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F2; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course surveys the history of the United States by examining its Native American, European, and African backgrounds, beginning with Indigenous peoples before 1492 and ending with the collapse of Reconstruction in 1877. This course emphasizes the roles played by cultural, economic, intellectual, political, and social institutions in American history, with an eye toward understanding the history of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative framework. The class is conducted in a seminar format and uses an intensive instructional methodology that is designed to challenge motivated students. Because of the similarity of the courses, credit may be earned for only one of the following courses: History 310, 320, 483, or 486.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history to 1877. (ProLO 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLO 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLO 1)
  • demonstrate an understanding of the inter-connectedness between United States history and global history to foster active civic engagement. 
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLOs 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLOs 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 484 History of the United States - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F3; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the study of American history from 1865 to the present day. It is a seminar-style honors course that uses an intensive instructional methodology that is designed to challenge motivated students and cultivate advanced critical thinking skills. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role played by the complex interrelationships of political, economic, social, and cultural forces in United States history after the Civil War and the role played by multiple ethnic groups as well. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 311.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history from 1865 to the present. (ProLO 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLO 3)
  • evaluate and analyze the diverse experiences and perspectives of multiple ethnic groups in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLO 1)
  • explain the inter-connectedness between United States history and global history to foster active civic engagement. (ProLO 2)
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLOs 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret historical material. (ProLOs 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 485 Recent United States History - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the study of American history from 1945 to the present day. It is a seminar-style honors course that uses an intensive instructional methodology designed to challenge motivated students and cultivate advanced critical thinking skills. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role played by complex interrelationships of political, economic, social, and cultural forces in United States history after World War II, and the role played by multiple ethnic groups as well. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 314.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history since 1945 (ProLo 4).
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing (ProLo 3).
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances (ProLo 1).
  • demonstrate an understanding of the interconnectedness between United States history and global history to foster active citizenship (ProLos 1, 2).
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues (ProLos 2, 3, 4).
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4).

HIST 486 History of the United States: African American Emphasis - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D; CSU Area F1; CSU Area F2
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the development of American Institutions and society through Reconstruction and partially fulfills American Institutions requirements for California State University and the University of California. The course emphasizes the role played by political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces in American society and the development of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative format. Beginning on the African Continent, this course will also examine the origins of the Atlantic Slave Trade and its implications for North American labor systems, including slavery. The course pays particular attention to the ways in which black people have influenced the formation and development of this nation; and examine the ways in which racial issues have shaped American society, culture, and politics. The class is conducted in a seminar format and uses intensive instructional methodology that is designed to challenge motivated students. Credit may be earned for HIST 320 or HIST 486, but not both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history through Reconstruction. (ProLo 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history, and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLo 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLo 1)
  • explain the interconnectedness between United States history and global history to foster active civic engagement.
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLos 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4)
  • demonstrate an understanding of U. S. History through current analytical categories of race, class, gender, and ethnicity.
  • demonstrate an understanding of America's growth in a global context.
  • explain the major economic, technological and scientific developments and thier historical significance.

HIST 487 History of the United States: African American Emphasis - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D; CSU Area F1
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers the development of American Institutions and society from Reconstruction to the present and partially fulfills American Institutions requirements for California State University and the University of California. The course emphasizes the role played by political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces in American society and the development of multiple ethnic groups in a comparative format. Beginning with a review of the Civil War, HIST 487 closely examines the Reconstruction Era, the societal "place" of African Americans, the development of "Jim Crow" segregation, and the subsequent legal demise of segregation in American life. This course pays close attention to the ways in which African American people have subsequently shaped and contributed to American society, culture, and politics. Credit may be earned for HIST 487 or HIST 321, but not both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, explain, and evaluate the major historical forces in United States history from 1865 to the present. (ProLo 4)
  • generate significant open-ended questions about United States history and critically analyze primary and secondary sources to construct historical arguments orally and/or in writing. (ProLo 3)
  • evaluate and analyze diverse experiences and perspectives in United States history through an examination of conflicting narratives and power imbalances. (ProLo 1)
  • explain the interconnectedness between United States history and global history to foster active civic engagement.
  • apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues. (ProLos 2, 3, 4)
  • collect, sift, organize, question, synthesize, and interpret complex material. (ProLos 1, 2, 3, 4)

HIST 494 Topics in History

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The content of this course will differ each time the course is offered. The objective is to examine various issues of historical significance. U.C. transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling U.C. campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted toward the minimum 60 units required for admission.


HIST 495 Independent Studies in History

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligibility for ENGWR 300, ENGWR 108, or ESLW 340, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

An independent studies project involves an individual student or a small group of students who wish to study, research, and/or pursue historical topics beyond those covered in regularly offered courses. This course will allow students to study specific topics and gain new perspectives in the discipline. U.C. transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling U.C. campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted toward the minimum 60 units required for admission.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop and pursue a research agenda on an historical topic or set of historical topics.
  • demonstrate the ability to recognize and interpret multiple forms of evidence such as visual images, oral accounts, statistical records, and artifacts from material culture.
  • critically analyze and assess historical evidence upon which different explanations and interpretations of historical phenomena are founded.
  • explain how socially constructed categories (such as race, class and gender) can be analyzed to explain historical phenomena.
  • identify and explain the sequence of cause and effect of historical phenomena.

HIST 499 Experimental Offering in History

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020