Psychology

Psychology (PSYC) Courses

PSYC 300 General Principles

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110, ENGWR 300, ENGWR 110, and/or LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. Students will be introduced to foundation principles and current trends in the field of psychology. Concepts that are explored include methods of psychological inquiry, the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, cognition, motivation, emotion, stress and health, personality, developmental psychology, psychological disorders, psychotherapy, and social psychology. This course is designed for psychology majors, behavioral and social science majors, and other students who desire a broad overview of the field.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • utilize critical thinking strategies to differentiate between scientifically derived knowledge and popular beliefs about psychological topics.
  • explain psychological research methods and their applications.
  • identify various subject areas and theoretical perspectives in psychology.
  • apply psychological concepts, theories, and research findings to personal and social contexts.
  • evaluate the role culture and diversity play in the various aspects of human behavior and mental processes.
  • explain the relative influences of biological and environmental factors on behavior and mental processes.

PSYC 310 Biological Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Completion of ENGRD 310 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The primary focus of this course is on the nervous system and the connection between its structure, function, and human behavior. This course provides an in-depth examination of the anatomy of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nervous system, neural development, neuronal communication, and genetic influences on neural structure and function. Structural and functional interactions of the nervous system with the endocrine, digestive, and immune systems are also examined. Other topics include the nervous system’s role in sensation, perception, motor activity, circadian rhythms, sleep, motivation, emotion, sex, gender, learning, memory, language, cognition, and consciousness. The neural bases of psychological disorders including addiction, depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia are also addressed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, current findings, research methods, and interdisciplinary components of biological psychology.
  • evaluate the psychobiological bases of various cognitive processes and behavior, including sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, sex, gender, movement, language, learning and memory, consciousness, and psychological disorders.
  • explain the key elements of the scientific method and ethical issues related to the use of human and nonhuman subjects in psychobiological research.
  • identify and describe the general structures and functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems, the plasticity of these systems and their interaction with other systems such as the endocrine, digestive, and immune.
  • discriminate the influence of genetic and environmental factors on nervous system development, function, and behavior.
  • discriminate the general anatomy of neurons and glia and their respective functions in the nervous system.
  • compare and contrast the key electrical and chemical properties of within-neuron communication including the resting, action, and graded potentials.
  • differentiate the critical steps in synaptic transmission and the neuronal processes that facilitate these steps including the dynamic role of receptor function.
  • evaluate the action of major psychoactive drugs on neural function and behavioral change.

PSYC 311 Biological Psychology Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 310 with grade of "C" or better or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 310.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course involves the applied study of the nervous system, focusing on its anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, and impact on behavioral and mental processes. This course will provide a foundation in the principles of the scientific method and practical experience in its application to the study of biological psychology. Specific topics include neuroanatomical organization of the nervous system with special emphasis on the brain; anatomy of neurons and glia; electrophysiology of nerves; anatomy and physiology of sensory systems; and psychophysical examination of sensorimotor processes and states of consciousness. Brain dissection procedures, microscopic analysis, interactive computer simulations, and lab experiments including electroencephalographic and electromyographic data collection will be utilized.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the foundation principles of the scientific method and demonstrate proficiency in their application.
  • conduct basic dissection of neural tissue.
  • discriminate among the anatomical features of the central and peripheral nervous system, their functions and connectivity.
  • identify the primary structural features of neurons, glia, and synapses at the cellular level
  • examine and explain the electrophysiology of neurons and its relationship to function.
  • employ safe and ethical laboratory procedures and demonstrate proficiency with primary equipment and techniques used to investigate both brain and neuronal structure and function, including dissection tools, the compound microscope, and EEG/EMG recording instruments.
  • conduct basic psychophysical data collection and analysis and interpret results.
  • compare and contrast various psychobiological research methods in terms of the type of information gained and their areas of application.

PSYC 314 Animal Behavior and Cognition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area D9
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed for anyone who is interested in or has ever lived with and loved animals. Those pursuing careers in psychology, biology, zoology, animal laboratory services, and veterinary technology will find this course interesting and useful. It consists of a broad survey of general topics and current research in the related fields of animal behavior, animal cognition, animal communication, interactions between human and non-human animals, and conservation biology. Topics addressed in this course include: the principles of evolution, history of the relationship between humans and non-humans, communication between humans and other animals; animals as competitors and resources, research animals and bioethics, animals as companions, animals in therapy and service, behavior of wild animals in zoos, and the future prospects for positive interactions between humans and non-human animals, especially as it relates to climate change. The course is designed to foster a better understanding of non-human animals, nurture a respect for them, and create an ethic that emphasizes a respect for all life and its threatened environments.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the scientific method and its application to the study of animal behavior.
  • evaluate the merits and shortcomings of different approaches employed by animal behavior scientists and the claims made for or against their findings.
  • critique reports in the popular press focused on animal behavior, communication, and intelligence.
  • articulate an understanding of the common origins of humans and other animals.
  • articulate the evolutionary relationships underlying the rationale for the use of animals in biomedical and neuroscientific research.
  • explain the contribution of animals to human health and well-being.
  • identify common requirements for life and the impact of human expansion on the future survival of many species.

PSYC 315 Psychopharmacology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:BIOL 100, PSYC 300, and PSYC 310 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The primary focus of this course will be on psychoactive drugs and their neural, physiological, cognitive, and behavioral effects. Both recreational and psychotherapeutic drugs will be examined. Core concepts will include neuroanatomy, neuronal communication, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs. These concepts will be used to understand the influence of drug action on various aspects of cognition, emotion, and behavior with specific emphasis on their role in psychological disorders and their treatment, recreational drug use, drug use disorders, addiction, learning and memory, cognitive enhancement, and dementia.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a basic understanding of the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system.
  • explain the key elements of neuronal communication, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics.
  • apply principles of neuroanatomy, neuronal communication, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics to the ability of drugs to modify cognition, emotion, and behavior.
  • evaluate the therapeutic and recreational uses of various psychoactive drugs in terms of their physiological, cognitive, and behavioral effects.
  • assess how various classes of drugs contribute to the etiology and treatment of psychological disorders.
  • evaluate psychopharmacological approaches to enhancing brain activity including in areas of retardation of aging, memory enhancement, and cognitive development.
  • explain the neurocircuitry and neurochemistry involved with processes of drug use disorders and addiction.
  • review and evaluate historical and contemporary approaches in psychopharmacology.

PSYC 316 Cognitive Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Cognitive Psychology is a course designed for those interested in developing a better understanding of cognitive science. Topics include: An overview of behaviorism and other theories of learning; contemporary areas of neuroscience; sensation and perception; short-term and long-term memory; language; linguistic and cognitive development; problem solving, judgment, and creativity. Current controversies related to the proposed structure of thought in both humans and non-humans will be addressed. Upon completion of this course, students will possess an improved appreciation for the complexity of brains and the plurality of minds that emerge from their activity.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe and explain the specific research methods commonly used in cognitive science.
  • using terminology appropriate for the discipline, compare and contrast major perspectives and theories in cognitive science.
  • apply cognitive psychological principles to real world situations, such as learning and memorization in the classroom and the maintenance of mindfulness in life.
  • demonstrate critical thinking about research in cognitive psychology, and demonstrate the ability to draw reasonable conclusions about the veracity of that research.
  • use concepts from cognitive neuroscience to describe the elements of cognition and behavior.
  • explain individual variation in patterns of sensation, perception, problem solving, and linguistic competence.

PSYC 320 Social Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310, ENGWR 300, ENGWR 110, and/or LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 170
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides students with an introduction to the scientific study of how people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Students become familiar with the major domains of social psychology and the relevance of social psychology to daily life. Topics covered include the history and perspectives of social psychology, foundational studies and current research, research methods utilized in social psychology, social cognition and perception, the power of the situation, sociocultural and biological influences on social behaviors and cognition, group processes, the effects of mass communication on social behaviors and cognition, aggression, prejudice, stereotyping and discrimination, love and attraction, altruism, conflict resolution, and the sustainable future.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine the history and foundational studies that form the basis for current concepts, theories, and research in social psychology.
  • critically analyze how people think about, influence, and relate to one another in terms of concepts, theories, and research in social psychology.
  • demonstrate applications of social psychological concepts, theories, and research findings to personal, interpersonal, organizational, and social contexts.
  • evaluate the interaction of social and biological influences on social behaviors and cognition.
  • evaluate diversity issues (e.g., culture and ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status) and their impact on social behaviors and cognition.

PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:MATH 120 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (effective Summer 2020)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area B4 (effective Fall 2020); IGETC Area 2 (effective Fall 2020)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course focuses upon the concepts and applications of descriptive and inferential statistics in psychology and other social and behavioral sciences. Topics include: descriptive statistics; probability and sampling distributions; parametric and nonparametric statistical methods; hypothesis testing; statistical inference; correlation and regression; chi-square; t-tests; and analysis of variance procedures. Application of both hand-computation and statistical software to data in a social science context will be emphasized, in addition to the interpretation of the relevance of the statistical findings.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • utilize appropriate statistical techniques to analyze and interpret applications using data from a variety of disciplines including, but not limited to psychology, sociology, social science, health science, and education.
  • identify standard methods of data collection and their advantages and disadvantages.
  • calculate descriptive statistics for discrete and continuous distributions, such as mean, variance, ranges, and best estimates.
  • calculate probabilities and percentiles using normal and t-distributions.
  • determine and interpret confidence intervals, levels of significance including p-values, and type I and II errors.
  • compare and contrast sample and population distributions and examine the influence of sampling method.
  • formulate testable hypotheses from samples from one or two populations and interpret results.
  • conduct analyses, infer, and interpret results with various statistical procedures including, but not limited to correlation, chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis H test, regression, and ANOVAs.
  • utilize statistical software (i.e. SPSS, Excel) and a graphing calculator to perform probability and statistical calculations and interpret results.
  • interpret data from tables and graphs and align with related numerical results.

PSYC 335 Research Methods in Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 (General Principles) with a grade of "C" or better; and either PSYC 330 (Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences) or STAT 300 (Introduction to Probability and Statistics) or STAT 480 (Introduction to Probability and Statistics - Honors) with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 and LIBR 318 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course introduces students to the principles, methods, and ethics of research in the social and behavioral sciences, especially Psychology. Key areas include the design, implementation, and evaluation of experimental and non-experimental research. Hypothesis testing, APA writing style, and the application of descriptive and inferential statistical analysis will be addressed. The laboratory portion provides opportunities to gain experience with design development, data collection, analysis and interpretation, and report writing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate knowledge of the application of basic ethical principles of research.
  • describe key aspects of the scientific method.
  • compare and contrast the main principles and parameters of various research methods, with specific emphasis on experimental vs. non-experimental designs.
  • demonstrate proficiency in designing both experimental and non-experimental research.
  • apply appropriate methods and techniques for data collection and analysis.
  • utilize databases and library resources to locate and critically evaluate primary and secondary sources.
  • utilize statistical applications for descriptive and inferential analysis.
  • utilize APA style in the development of all aspects of a research report.
  • integrate research findings and statistical results in order to interpret data and form conclusions.

PSYC 340 Abnormal Behavior

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 or ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course, students will explore the broad questions of normality and abnormality, and investigate specific mental, emotional, and behavioral difficulties. They will learn current approaches to psychological intervention including present community mental health practices. Students will consider the contribution of social, biological, psychological, and cultural factors to the development and persistence of behavior disorders.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and evaluate the criteria used to define abnormal behavior.
  • evaluate the advantages, disadvantages, and stigmas associated with diagnostic labeling.
  • classify specific psychological disorders using the DSM-5 diagnostic system.
  • recognize and evaluate the contribution of social, biological, psychological, and cultural factors to the development and persistence of behavioral disorders.
  • discuss the influence of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, social class, and culture on the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of psychological disorders.
  • compare, contrast, and evaluate current approaches to psychological intervention including psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, humanistic, family systems, biological, and sociocultural approaches.
  • apply critical thinking strategies to the understanding of issues and controversies in abnormal psychology.
  • demonstrate understanding of research and clinical ethics in abnormal psychology.

PSYC 352 Psychology of Peace and Conflict

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and ENGWR 51 with grades of "C" or better or ESLW 310 and ESLR 310 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course will include the psychological dynamics that promote peaceful, collaborative actions among people as opposed to conflicted states that support aggressive acts of violence among people. Materials will span from acts of aggression intragroup to the larger escalation of wars between cultures. Also included will be consideration of the apparent aggressive behaviors manifested against the physical environment ranging from defacing public property to the near-destruction of the earth's ecological systems.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critique research on the human propensities towards aggression and collaboration from seminal thinkers in psychology.
  • analyze efforts by power structures to manipulate human emotions for ulterior reasons and causes.
  • investigate psychology and philosophical paradigms as to how these models interface with human choices for peace and/or aggression.
  • demonstrate how principles and research methodologies of psychology relate to the field of human aggression through understandings of the works of John Dollard, et al.

PSYC 355 Love and Intimacy

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an investigation of the human desire for affiliation and affection. Emphasis will be placed on types of love, levels of bonding, differences between love and relationship addiction, and ways in which individuals frustrate their desire for intimacy and/or exit from potentially intimate encounters in life.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the motivations for love and the types of love found among human beings.
  • assess the prevailing myths of romantic love in American culture, the manipulation of romantic love for extrinsic purposes, and the hazards of the myth.
  • critique materials concerning the human desire for intimacy, the common fears surrounding this desire, and the barriers used to prevent intimacy.
  • examine the differences between being-based love, deficiency-based love, and concomitant addictive relationships.
  • employ critical thinking skills and more accurately assess cultural mythologies concerning love and intimacy.

PSYC 356 Human Sexuality

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310 or ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides a balanced scientific understanding of sexual literacy from a cultural, physiological, sociological, and psychological perspective. Students will be provided with a solid base of information about sex and their own sexuality enabling them to make healthy and responsible choices and decisions throughout their lives. Course topics include: sexual research, sexual contents (culture, history, religion), social media impact, anatomy and physiology, arousal and response, sexual infections, contraception, reproduction, gender identity, sexual orientation, child/adolescent sexual development, adult and aging sexual well-being, love and communication, coercion and treatment.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between scientifically-derived knowledge and myths related to sexual research.
  • compare and contrast the major theoretical contexts of human sexual behaviors and development through history, religion, and personal cultural contexts.
  • evaluate psychological data, draw reasonable conclusions, apply critical thinking skills to the impact of current social media, and government impact on personal, community, and scientific problems relating to research findings on sexual motivation, variety, differences, and issues.
  • compare male and female anatomical structures and their functions; intersex individuals
  • develop an understanding of variation in human sexual arousal and response, contraception, reproduction, pregnancy and delivery.
  • identify guidelines for safeguarding and improving sexual health and well-being by understanding current issues related to sexual infections and disease.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the factors that influence sexual development and interaction across the life span, infancy, adolescence, adulthood, and aging.
  • compare and contrast interpersonal attachment, relationships, and effective and ineffective communication strategies.
  • compare and contrast the research findings with current issues on sexual coercion, harassment, date rape, rape, human trafficking, prostitution, and pornography.
  • evaluate all data from psychological, cultural, and ethical perspectives.

PSYC 358 Principles of Interpersonal Relations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310 and ENGWR 101 with grades of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the principles involved in healthy and effective interpersonal relationships. Topics include interpersonal feedback, self-disclosure, the role of emotions in relationships, the art of listening, and common stresses/strains on relationships. The focus of the course will be on concepts useful to the students in their face-to-face relationships at home, school, and work.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate familiarity with relationship theories and concepts.
  • examine the history and foundational studies that form the basis for current concepts, theories, and research in relationship science.
  • identify and differentiate among the research methods commonly used in relationship science.
  • analyze the concept of interpersonal attraction, contrasting evolutionary explanations with those more recent.
  • examine relationship skills and apply to real-world situations.
  • explain the differences between various types of relationships.
  • demonstrate a basic level of self-knowledge and personal insight as they pertain to relationships.
  • identify healthy and unhealthy relationship patterns involving communication, power, intimacy, sex, and conflict.
  • investigate the various evidence-based approaches to relationship maintenance and repair.

PSYC 360 Psychology of Women

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course, students will study the impact of sex and gender on women's lives. An emphasis is placed on the interplay between gender and race, ethnicity, class, age, sexual orientation, and physical and mental ability. The course addresses a variety of topics including gender stereotypes and their connections to sexism, gender roles and expectations, biological bases of sex, gender throughout the lifespan, the physical and mental health of women, women and work, and violence against women. The course also emphasizes the importance of critically evaluating theory and research on sex and gender.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify, describe, and evaluate key theories and research findings that pertain to the psychology of women.
  • compare and contrast traditional and feminist psychological theories of gender.
  • analyze and identify the biological, developmental, societal, political, and historical factors that influence women’s behavior.
  • identify the key developmental milestones women experience across the lifespan.
  • explain how gender discrimination and oppression have shaped women's experience.
  • identify and describe examples of how intersecting aspects of identity (e.g., race, ethnicity, age, class status, etc.) influence women's experience.
  • apply knowledge of women’s experiences and behavior to suggest solutions to practical problems.

PSYC 364 Psychology of Sexual Orientation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

In this course, students will examine topics and research related to lesbian, gay, and bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI) individuals. Topics will include causes of sexual orientation, causes of intersex conditions and transgender identities, theories of identity development, coming out, prejudice and discrimination against LGBTQI individuals, sexual orientation and gender identity across the lifespan, LGBTQI relationships, sexuality, religion and spirituality, and physical and mental health issues. In this course, students will also examine the intersection of gender identity and sexual orientation with other identity characteristics, such as race, ethnicity, age, ability status, and culture. This course will draw from a variety of political, cultural, sociological, philosophical, and psychological perspectives in order to fully understand the influence of sexual orientation and gender identity on our lives.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define and distinguish between sexual orientation, homophobia, heterosexism, sexual identity, gender identity, and other key terms.
  • summarize the key research findings pertaining to LGBTQI individuals.
  • demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate theories and research pertaining to sexual orientation and gender identity.
  • describe and analyze the impact of sexual and gender minority status, including the impact of homophobia, heterosexism, biphobia, and transphobia.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the impact of other forms of oppression, such as racism, ageism, and sexism, on sexual minorities.
  • describe and analyze the psychological, social, and political issues that pertain to LGBTQI individuals.
  • identify and evaluate strategies and life skills LGBTQI individuals can use to enhance their lives.

PSYC 367 Psychology of Minorities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGRD 310 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Students will study the individual and collective impact of minority group status in the United States on an individual’s and group's behaviors and mental processes. The psychological issues, concerns, needs, and values of minority individuals in the United States are also studied. In this course, the study of minority individuals includes those who are diverse by race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, weight, religion, age, and physical, cognitive, emotional, or developmental ability. The cognitive and emotional aspects of prejudice as they relate to institutional and individual discrimination are also explored. This course is useful for students majoring in psychology, sociology, education, ethnic studies, and the helping/allied professions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the guiding concepts and dimensions in a psychological study of minority populations.
  • evaluate how diversity and minority status are both individually and socially constructed.
  • assess the major types of minority populations present in the United States, how they are defined, and their demographics.
  • examine issues related to individual and institutionalized ethnocentrism, stereotyping, and prejudice, including recognizing one's own ethnocentrism, stereotypes and prejudice.
  • evaluate the impact of culture and minority status on basic psychological processes.
  • examine the influence of culture and minority status on issues related to physical and mental health.
  • evaluate specific psychological and social issues, and problems among minority populations in the United States.
  • apply appropriate solutions, and/or interventions to minority population's identified issues and problems.
  • evaluate how issues of minority populations are interwoven with social and political institutions (e.g. government, healthcare, and education).

PSYC 370 Human Development: A Life Span

  • Same As:FCS 324
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Students will study the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of humans from conception through the life span. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and practical application of developmental principles including atypical aspects of development. Major developmental theories concerning life span development will be studied. Topics from conception to death will be presented including: conception, prenatal development, including prenatal developmental complications, physical, cognitive, social, emotional developmental, and developmental issues. Included in these broad developmental areas are learning, brain development, personality, morality, and societal influences on development. Atypical development and challenges to optimal development will be included. The course also examines end of life issues and bereavement. This is a foundational course for careers in the educational, social, psychological, and medical fields. Students may receive credit for FCS 324 or PSYC 370, but not both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify developmental factors that are influenced by heredity and environment including factors that lead to atypical and delayed development.
  • describe and give examples of how the scientific method can be used to evaluate research in life span development.
  • evaluate the research on the influence of nature and nurture.
  • compare and contrast how identity is developed and how identity changes during the life span.
  • analyze how the concept of gender influences development.
  • examine cultural factors that shape development and influence values, attitudes, and beliefs.
  • analyze a major life event or time period based on life span theories.

PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging

  • Same As:GERON 302
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and ENGWR 101, OR ESLR 340 and ESLW 340 and ESL 114, and FCS 324/PSYC 370, and LIBR 318 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the physical, psychological, social, and emotional aspects of the aging process including the interactions between the elderly and the rest of society. Topics include an analysis of stereotypes, social connections, environmental influences, sexuality, physical health, mental health, death, and bereavement. Credit may be earned for either PSYC 374 or GERON 302, but not both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine and discuss different theoretical perspectives used in explaining adult development and behavior.
  • explain the normal aging changes and analyze how lifestyle choices influence the aging process.
  • analyze and discuss how ethnic diversity influences the aging process.
  • analyze the values of different cohorts and how those values impact the aging experience.
  • analyze the financial costs of aging in terms of retirement planning, Social Security, pensions, and health care programs.
  • compare alternative living environments in terms of appropriateness and affordability.
  • compile a diversity of resources, local and otherwise, available to support successful aging.

PSYC 390 Psychology of Death and Dying

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 and ENGWR 51 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an investigation of beliefs, attitudes, anxieties, and behaviors associated with dying and death. Included will be materials relevant to suicide, life-threatening illnesses, bereavement, euthanasia, and various philosophical views on the phenomenon of death. One field trip to visit a cemetery, attend a funeral/memorial, or tour a funeral home is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate thanatology as an interdisciplinary subject with psychological, spiritual, philosophical social, cultural and historical aspects of death and dying.
  • explain the impact of culture and family on death rituals and death systems.
  • evaluate the psychic pain of suicide, how one can help ameliorate the pain, and the various forms suicide can take, such as altruistic suicide and culturally-defined suicide.
  • describe the dynamics of grief, bereavement and the typical process of adult and children’s mourning.

PSYC 392 Loss and Grief

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course will explore the causes of grief reactions and the dynamics of bereavement. Expressions of normal grief will be compared with pathological reactions, and suggested interventions for resolving grief reactions will be addressed. Techniques for the resolution of loss and coping strategies will be presented.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explore losses as a natural consequence of being human and discuss current trends in coping strategies.
  • explore their personal history of loss and his/her personal coping styles.
  • understand the multi-faceted nature and the universality of the grief process, including disenfranchised, delayed, chronic, and somatic expressions of grief.
  • recognize normal grief and complicated grief as it applies to sudden death, trauma, or catastrophe. Be able to differentiate between grief and depression.
  • understand various cultural traditions and gender stereotypes related to bereavement and how they support us or injure us.
  • reduce the anxieties of our inevitable experiences of loss.
  • identity local and national resources for support.
  • be able to describe children’s and teen's cognitive and psychosocial understanding of death and loss at various developmental stages.
  • understand how to integrate hope into the grief journey.
  • develop greater empathy and consolation skills for all people.

PSYC 405 Substance Abuse: Effects on Body and Behavior

  • Same As:ADMJ 303
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310 and ENGWR 300 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course will educate students in drug identification, signs and symptomatology, methods of use, duration of effect, behaviors, addiction, and treatment options. The course examines historical and contemporary perspectives of substance abuse issues, epidemiologic data used to establish the prevalence, incidence, and identity of at risk groups, and trends of substances of abuse and approaches to treatment. This course is especially advised for people who are seeking or working in careers in health, law enforcement, counseling, psychology, business, social services, or teaching. Credit may be earned for either PSYC 405 or ADMJ 303, but not for both.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the anatomy, physiology, and basic chemistry of the nervous system.
  • explain the key elements of neural signaling, pharmacokinetics and dynamics, and drug effects on neural communication and on behavior.
  • demonstrate familiarity with historical and current substance abuse laws.
  • define and distinguish between drug addiction, dependence, misuse and abuse, and licit and illicit drugs.
  • describe potential risk factors for use and apply culturally appropriate solutions and/or interventions to various substance using/abusing populations.
  • examine the influence of culture and diversity on issues related to substance use and abuse as well as political, social, and economic factors involved in supply and demand; recognize, understand, and analyze how substance use and abuse issues are interwoven with economic, social, legal, and political institutions.
  • define and distinguish among the major categories of drugs in our society (e.g. stimulants, narcotics, hallucinogens) and identify any psychotherapeutic benefits.
  • describe current options for recovery/treatment from addiction/dependence and resources available at federal, state, and local levels.

PSYC 410 Psychology of Creativity, Intuition and Problem Solving

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110, ENGWR 51, and PSYC 300 with grades of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to define and encourage the creative process and how it relates to personal success and expression, problem solving, and intuition. It will feature writing, art, music, movement, creative visualization, and stress management in a supportive group atmosphere.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the creative process.
  • relate elements of creativity to the practical, theoretical, psychological, and spiritual domains.
  • translate the enriching and expanding dimensions of creativity into life experience.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the interrelationship of the body, mind, and emotion.
  • participate in activities, particularly movement, that engage the total person and provide a vehicle for self-expression, understanding, healing, and growth.
  • identify personal preferences of expression.
  • create environments and become comfortable with physical materials involved in cultivating creativity in work and leisure.

PSYC 412 The Heroic Journey

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 110 or ENGWR 51 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Using ideas from Lao Tzu, Campbell, Jung, Pearson, Bolen, et al., the course will promote an understanding of the heroic journey of everyday people. The functions, processes, and totems of archetypal stations of the Tao of life such as juggler, jester, altruist, warrior, wanderer, etc. will be shared. The heroic journey will be viewed as metaphor for psychological wounding and healing, fragmentation and individuation, and joining with other sentient beings in the processes of becoming whole.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the contributions to learning by Joseph Campbell, C. G. Jung, and other seminal thinkers.
  • demonstrate an improved understanding of the normality of psychological wounding and processes by which healing occurs.
  • analyze human development as a life-long process in the movement toward wholeness.

PSYC 480 Honors General Principles

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program.
  • Advisory:LIBR 318 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to the major areas in the field of psychology. Topics to be covered include physiological processes, learning, cognition, development, personality, psychological disorders, therapy, social psychology, and research methodologies in psychology. These topics will be discussed from a variety of classical and contemporary psychological perspectives. Critical thinking and application of concepts will be an integral part of the course. There will be oral and written assignments as well as experiential activities in the course. This honors course uses an intensive pedagogical approach designed to allow motivated students to develop critical thinking skills, skills of oral and written expression, proficiency in library and Internet-based research, and creativity. Pedagogical strategies used in this course include student-led group discussion, oral and written presentations, extensive reading, exposure to theory and research in the field, and various activities and demonstrations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate mastery of the basic theoretical perspectives of psychology.
  • demonstrate an understanding of central issues relevant to many subfields of psychology.
  • differentiate between scientific and pseudo-scientific psychological information.
  • differentiate among various points of view regarding psychological issues.
  • apply critical thinking skills in psychology.
  • create a group-learning atmosphere which encourages critical thinking, respect, and support.
  • apply, through writing and speaking, psychological theories and points of view to real-world issues.

PSYC 495 Independent Studies in Psychology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course involves an individual student or small groups of students in study, research, or activities beyond the scope of regular offered courses, pursuant to agreement among college, faculty members, and students. Independent studies in psychology offers students a chance to
do research that is more typical of theoretical and applied psychology. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted towards the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • actively engage in intellectual inquiry beyond that required in order to pass a course of study.
  • apply psychological theory to work in independent studies.

PSYC 499 Experimental Offering in Psychology

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020