Category Archives: Databases

We’re glad to say that we are now offering unlimited access to the Sacramento Bee via NewsBank. NewsBank allows us to search and read Bee content without online ads, auto-playing videos and other distractions.

To find it, visit the Research Databases page and look for the Sacramento Bee Collection. NewsBank divides the Bee into a few different categories that can be searched together or individually:

Sacramento bee E-edition from June 10, 2019

If you’d like to, say, get an email with links to new content as it’s loaded, NewsBank will let you do that—look for create alert links. We hope this resource helps students researching local events and issues.

For the month of April you can feast upon news content from NewsBank: thousands of news sources from the US and abroad via Access World News.

NewsBank is also showing us the Sacramento Bee Collection, which brings us our local paper all the way back to 1857.

We’re also taking a look at AM Explorer, which provides primary source collections: letters, diaries, photos, audio recordings, newspaper clippings, and all sorts of incredible whiffs of the past. Try a search from the landing page or, better yet, click the Collections link and explore titles such as African American Communities, American Indian Histories and Cultures, and Gender: Identity and Social Change.

Find these and, of course, many others, at the Research Databases page.

And let us know your thoughts! We might be able to subscribe to one or more of them in the future.

The Library is currently providing trial access to the US Major Dailies database, which carries full-text articles from The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune. If you are working on a project involving social issues, politics, current events, communication or any number of other issues, you may find this useful! It will be available until March 13.

Find this and many others at the Research Databases page.

We currently have some trial databases available:

  • Ovid Nursing Full Text Plus provides current high-impact journals from the field. A few titles from other Allied Health areas are also available as part of the trial.
  • SAGE Ebooks includes full-text books in various topics, including criminal justice, communication studies and more.

Check these out and let a librarian know what you think!

Very frequently, articles from subject-specific encyclopedias provide a great starting point for research. OneSearch provides some of these as “Research Starters” that pop up for certain searches.

We’ve now enhanced and expanded that feature by pulling in content from one of our other databases, Gale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL), which provides loads of useful reference articles. Do a simple search and, if we’ve got an article in GVRL that matches, up to three such articles will appear at the top of the screen under the heading Topic Overviews.

Search for Nativism brings three results from different encyclopedias

We’ll be tracking the number of clicks on these items and otherwise assessing how this new feature is being used. We’re very happy to have the opportunity to develop OneSearch in student-friendly ways. If you’ve got thoughts on how it could be better, contact a librarian and let us know!

Films on Demand is now available to all Los Rios students and faculty! This database provides over 20,000 videos that can be streamed in full or clip-by-clip. You’ll find the link you need on the Research Databases page.

Films on Demand

Films on Demand features videos from many top producers of educational video content, including PBS, the BBC, NOVA, and Frontline.

Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years WikiSecretsJazz: A Film by Ken Burns

You’ll also find Films on Demand titles while using OneSearch; however, what is listed in OneSearch may be slightly out of date, so for the best selection we recommend going directly to the Films on Demand website and searching there.

We expect that one of the primary ways Films on Demand will be used is instructors assigning films or clips in classes. You’ll be able to do so by posting links to the program, using the Record URL found on the program’s page (not the search results page).

Record URL on detailed record page

Even easier, in D2L and Canvas you can insert clips into your courses without leaving your course shell. More info will be coming on that score from Distance Ed and Instructional Development. For now, take a look at the vendor’s quick start guide, which has good info on creating a personal account to create folders you can share with students.

It’s time to buckle down and make progress on those research papers.

OneSearch, Los Rios Libraries

If you’re doing research, you’re probably spending some time in OneSearch, which is our main tool for finding books, articles and other library content.

So let’s cover a few tips here.

1. Understand how keywords work

Google makes us lazy; we can type any garbage we like into it and it seems to know more or less what we meant.

Google search for: where are tho hamtsers who eat tacos. Spelling corrected, includes relevant results about burritos

Library search tools are much more literal. All they do is match words. So, if you include a keyword and it’s not in the title or abstract or subjects—the item won’t show. That’s why:

 a search for methods of preventing domestic violence against women brings fewer than 40 results

Too many words! Plenty of articles on that subject don’t have some the words “method” or “against”, so they don’t show in results. Compare:

Query domestic violence prevention programs brings 4,000 results

Your keywords need to match content in the source, so start with just a few and add on!

2. Limit your results by format

By default, OneSearch will show you all different kinds of content. But what if you’re not interested in articles, and are only looking for books you can check out?

Don’t overwork your retina scanning the page. Instead, use the Books & Videos on Library Shelves limiter.

Books & Videos on Library Shelves limiter in OneSearch

Once you’ve done that, most of your results will be books. Were you told you need to find scholarly articles? You can limit to Scholarly (Peer-Reviewed) Journals. Check out the Source Types area for other options.

3. Email yourself ebook chapters

We have been plugging ebooks lately and for good reason—thousands of recently published academic titles are waiting for your attention.

Sometimes it’s not totally clear what to do with these, though. You can read them page by page online but that can be inconvenient. Sometimes the easiest thing is to email yourself a chapter. When you’re in the book, click Email Pages, then look for something labeled This section.

Email chapter of EBSCO ebook
There’s a limit to how many pages you can email yourself at a time, but usually a chapter or two is short enough. If you hit the limit, try later that day and you’ll find that the limit has been reset.

4. Save formatted citations

Is it fun making a Works Cited page? Maybe! But event then, you might want some help. When looking at an article, you’ll see a Cite link; click that and look what happens.

But wait, there’s more. If you’ve used EBSCO databases at all you probably have emailed yourself articles. Well take a look at the options on the email form and you’ll see that there’s something labeled Citation Format.

Email MLA citation in EBSCO record

What could it mean?

The citations aren’t always perfect, but they’re a good start. Remember, we’ve got citation tips over at our Research Guides page.

5. Don’t get frustrated by bad links

One of the things OneSearch does is bring together a bunch of different databases. So you’ll see links to JSTOR, ScienceDirect and others in your search results. Usually these links work, but sometimes…

404 page in ScienceDirect
Ask a Librarian - Live ChatDon’t despair! If a link appeared, usually it means that we do have the article, even if the link itself fails. So in that case you can click the Ask a Librarian icon and ask us to get you the article.

In general, use Ask A Librarian whenever you’re having problems—we’re here to help.

This semester we launched a new version of OneSearch, which provides access to our book & media collection and most of our research databases. I could tell you all about what it does and how to use it, but our friends at the Cosumnes River College Library made a video that does a much better job, in a very short amount of time, than I could hope to do. Enjoy! And tell your friendly librarians how you’re using it.

OneSearch logoOver the last few months, the library has been working on a new look and feel for OneSearch, the tool that provides access our books, videos, and a large chunk of our online databases. OneSearch has been very widely used at SCC for the last couple years; when you do a search from the library homepage using the “All” tab, that’s where you end up.

You can now preview the new version of OneSearch. When you do a search from the library home page, you’ll see a link asking if you want to go to the new version. Click it, and you’ll get there.

You’ll find several new features aimed at improving access to our locally held books & videos. Searching for textbooks on reserve? Click the “Find Textbooks on Reserve” link at the top of the screen to launch special search form similar to the one you find on the library website. Want to text a call number to yourself? From a book’s page, click the “Share” icon next to the call number and you’ll be able to do so.

We’ll be continuing to work on the new OneSearch through the summer. In the Fall semester, we’ll be sending the older library catalog (often known as “LOIS”) into semi-retirement. So let us know what you think of OneSearch! After you’ve used it for a little, you’ll get a survey prompt. We’d love to hear your thoughts.

We are currently providing trial access to Statista, a site that compiles statistics from various sources and presents them in visually arresting ways. Many of the stats have a business angle, but variety is the key word here. Some examples:

You get the idea.

You can easily toggle between different kinds of charts, and then download a high-quality image, PDF or PowerPoint slide, or export the data as an Excel file.

Where does the info come from? According to Statista,

data sources include market research reports, such as the Ipsos Affluent Survey published annually by Ipsos Media, Simmons National Consumer Studies and Consumer Insights from Scarborough Research, as well as trade publications, scientific journals, and government databases.

Threshold for Herd Immunity for Select Diseases 2013

What do you think? Let a librarian know. You can find it through March 27 on our Research Databases page, or click below.

Go to Statista