Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education (ECE) Courses

ECE 294 Topics in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to study topics in Early Childhood Education that are not included in current offerings.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • investigate topics not available in the curriculum of the department.
  • identify and discover timely topics in the field.

ECE 295 Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education offers students the opportunity to explore topics and interests that are not available through a current semester's regular course offerings. Students must have a faculty member willing to support and evaluate the student's progress towards the student's learning objectives.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify an area of interest and design a plan of activities to gain knowledge or skills in that area.
  • independently follow a proposed plan of study from the design stage to completion.
  • evaluate and reflect on personal skills, abilities, and knowledge.

ECE 299 Experimental Offering in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020


ECE 300 Introduction to Principles and Practices in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an introduction to early childhood education, including an overview of the history of the field, evolution of professional practices and ethics, and developmentally appropriate educational principles and practices that support child development from birth through the school-age years. The early education principle of teaching practices based on observation, documentation, and interpretation of children's behavior will be introduced. The importance of the teacher/child relationship based on positive, culturally relevant, supportive, and mutually rewarding interactions is a foundation of the course. ECE 300 is recommended as the first course for students interested in learning more about the field.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • relate historical and current perspectives on childhood, different philosophies of teaching young children, and the historical and cultural contexts influencing early childhood education in the United States.
  • identify career paths, certification options, professional associations, and dispositions for working within the early childhood field. Students will be able to identify educational and experiential requirements of their chosen career path.
  • choose principles and practices to guide teaching when working with young children, to include the implementation and assessment of developmentally appropriate learning environments, routines that involve children in applying emerging skills, and strategies that support young children's social competence. This includes positive guidance practices appropriate for children of different developmental stages, including children with special developmental needs and various languages and cultural backgrounds.
  • investigate methods of using a play-based, developmentally appropriate curriculum planned from observations of the children's play as a vehicle for teaching skills, concepts, critical thinking, and assessment in the early childhood classroom with respect to the cultural, linguistic, and developmental differences presented by children.
  • define the importance of establishing environments, practices, and curriculum that support all children including those with diverse characteristics such as culture, language, socio-economic status, and special needs.
  • identify and assess the developmental needs and differences of children from infancy through school age; become aware of how curriculum needs to change as children develop.

ECE 302 Computer Skills for Educators

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed for educators of early childhood, elementary, and adolescent children. The course provides a comprehensive overview of the use of computer education and technology in the classroom in order to enhance the education advancement of the child and facilitate ease of instruction and administration for the teacher. The course provides hands-on experience in the use of computer applications, educational software, and problem-solving skills through the development of an electronic portfolio process.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define and describe the key issues in the access, use, and control of computer technology that focuses on early childhood and school age education.
  • utilize basic computer systems and operations that specifically relate to applications addressing early childhood and school age programs.
  • assess and evaluate developmentally appropriate computer software while also researching current trends for use in an early childhood and/or school age classroom.
  • demonstrate the use of representative computer education related applications and programs to complete assignments related to early childhood and school age classroom management, including assessment.
  • differentiate the use of critical thinking skills in the use of technology in early childhood and school age programs.
  • demonstrate the use of teacher utility programs, such as incorporating applications, including but not limited to, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software, and databases that enhance the expansion and management in program planning, organization, and curriculum implementation.
  • describe the age-appropriate computer skills for young and school age children.
  • synthesize, assemble, and produce a developmentally appropriate curriculum /lesson plan for young children using technology.
  • present validated research and current trends based on the subject-matter related to the student's area of interest.

ECE 305 Introduction to Family Child Care

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course examines the operation of a Family Child Care business including developmentally appropriate teaching practices in Early Childhood Education. It includes licensing regulations, business practices, health and safety standards, and appropriate practices and curriculum for children in a family child care setting.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the components of a successful and developmentally appropriate licensed family child care facility.
  • develop a plan for a licensed family child care facility including philosophy, curriculum, policies, routines, guidance practices, as well as for communication and marketing.
  • interpret and reference the legal regulations of family child care homes (Title 22), fire code, and other health and safety requirements.

ECE 312 Child Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID CDEV 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed for students to study the growth and development of children from the prenatal stage through adolescence. For each stage of development, the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social-moral, and emotional aspects of development with attention to both typical as well as atypical development are discussed in each area. Included are the influences of culture, family, and the environment. The material in this course is designed as a foundation for teaching in the elementary school, nursing, early childhood education, and parenting.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a knowledge of the domains of physical, cognitive, language, and socio-emotional development.
  • identify developmental stages in all domains from prenatal through adolescence, including crucial periods such as birth, preschool, elementary school, and puberty.
  • describe current and prominent theories of child development, including how research informs developmental theory.
  • apply developmental theories to teaching, child rearing practices, and other professional work with children with consideration of the influence of culture, ethnicity, race, family structure and social issues.
  • differentiate typical behavior of children and the individual differences and special needs (physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development) with sensitivity to the cultural and family context of individual children.
  • evaluate the impact of current issues in education on the development of children including children with typical and atypical development, cultural, racial, gender, and family diversity.

ECE 314 The Child, the Family and the Community

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • C-ID:C-ID CDEV 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an examination of the developing child in a societal context focusing on the interrelationship of family, school, and community and emphasizing historical and socio-cultural factors. Influences on growth and development including media, social class, gender, sexual orientation, racial/ethnic groups, and their relationship to family behavior will be explored.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze theories of socialization that address the interrelationship of child, family, and community.
  • assess how educational, political, and socioeconomic factors directly impact the lives of children and families.
  • synthesize and analyze research regarding social issues, changes, and transitions that affect children, families, schools, and communities.
  • appraise strategies that support and empower families through respectful, reciprocal relationships to involve all families in their children's development and learning.
  • analyze their own values, goals, and sense of self as related to family history and life experiences, assessing how this impacts relationships with children and families.
  • critique public policy as it relates to the well-being of children and families.

ECE 320 Curriculum and Interactions in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:4
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 and 312 with grades of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must show proof of negative Tuberculosis as well as immunizations or immunity to Tetanus, Diphtheria, Acellular Pertussis (TDAP), measles, and rubella. Annual flu shots, a physician's exemption from the flu shot, or a statement declining the shot are also required prior to participating in the lab.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course offers students the opportunity to integrate theory into practice as they work on planning, implementing, and evaluating classroom activities, assessing individual children's strengths and learning needs, and participating in the routines of an early learning classroom. In this supervised field experience course, students are enrolled in both a lecture and lab section. During weekly in-class meetings with the instructor, students are presented with the developmentally appropriate theory that grounds curriculum and interactions in high quality early childhood education classrooms. Students are required to take this theory into lab where they have the opportunity to apply and practice what they are learning in the lecture. Topics include the teacher's role in the development of curriculum based on observation and assessment of the individual needs of the children in the program. The teacher's role in guidance and the development of social competence in children is stressed. The students will be assigned to the campus Child Development Center during specific times of the day for supervised laboratory experiences. Students may also complete up to 50 percent of their lab hours at off campus sites if they are employed at least 20 hours per week at the site. Students completing any hours at off campus sites must be under the direct supervision of a staff person eligible for or holding a Master Teacher Permit or higher level permit. Students may also complete lab under the supervision of a mentor teacher selected by the California Early Childhood Mentor Teacher Program coordinated by Los Rios District Early Childhood Education faculty.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply developmentally appropriate principles and practices to support young children's optimal development and learning within healthy, safe, respectful, culturally supportive, and challenging learning environments.
  • use observation strategies to assess and plan curriculum that meets the variation of children's strengths and needs in an early childhood education classroom. Use observation to document, interpret, and reflect upon curriculum and practices as part of ongoing personal teaching and program evaluation and improvement.
  • design, develop, and evaluate play-based learning environments for young children, routines that involve young children in applying emerging ideas and skills, and developmentally appropriate and inclusive learning activities for young children.
  • plan, implement, and evaluate experiences that support young children in building a foundation for language and literacy, math and science, social sciences, cooking, and the arts.
  • recognize respectful and reciprocal relationships with families, with particular attention to supporting families whose home language is other than English or whose children may have special needs.
  • demonstrate the teacher's role in communication and guidance strategies that support the development of young children's social competence.

ECE 321 Advanced Practicum in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:4
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300, 312, and 320 with grades of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must show proof of negative Tuberculosis as well as immunizations or immunity to Tetanus, Diphtheria, Acellular Pertussis (TDAP), measles, and rubella. Annual flu shots, a physician's exemption from the flu shot, or a statement declining the shot are also required prior to participating in the lab.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 210
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This advanced practicum course provides supervised field experience in an early childhood education program. Students will participate as teachers in a classroom with young children and attend weekly lectures. Students will plan and implement long-term curriculum projects with young children, applying their skills in observation, assessment, documentation, and interpretation of children's work. There is a deeper examination of how young children construct knowledge in literacy, math, science, and how teachers develop curriculum. Students will develop and supervise the overall setting for learning and demonstrate skill in guiding children's behavior, managing groups, and building relationships with children and families. Students will be assigned to the campus Child Development Center or approved programs for supervised field experience practicum. Students may also complete up to 50 percent of their lab hours at off campus sites if they are employed at least 20 hours per week at the site. Students completing any hours at off campus sites must be under the direct supervision of a staff person eligible for or holding a Master Teacher Permit or higher level permit. Students may also complete lab under the supervision of a mentor teacher selected by the California Early Childhood Mentor Teacher Program coordinated by Los Rios District Early Childhood Education faculty.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • integrate the guiding principles and practices of early childhood teaching into their practices, making use of current research and theory in child development to assess and reflect on their own and fellow teachers' experiences.
  • design, observe, and evaluate a complete classroom environment wherein children construct knowledge within the context of play, with consideration for children of differing abilities, cultural backgrounds, and developmental needs.
  • plan, implement, observe, and evaluate the overall and ongoing curriculum and learning encounters, developing opportunities for children to apply emerging skills in the areas of: language and literacy, math and science, the arts, physical development, and social sciences.
  • demonstrate the use of observation, documentation, and interpretation for curriculum planning, assessment of children's learning, and advocacy in regard to sharing with children, family, and the community about children's learning.
  • support the development of a climate of care and respect among children, teachers, and families, supporting all in developing social competence, applying strategies for negotiating disputes, fostering caring relations, and sharing responsibility for a learning community that includes the diversity of all the children and families.

ECE 322 Promoting Children's Social Competence

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ECE 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed for teachers in early education programs to promote positive guidance methods. It is based on supporting children's development of social competence. The course includes strategies for understanding and responding to children's behavior in ways that are congruent with the core values of early childhood education. Concepts of guidance relating to typical and atypical development, culture, and environment will be presented. Parents of young children may also find the course of value.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • integrate knowledge of child development into the understanding of the development of social competence and choice of guidance strategies.
  • identify elements of children's and adult's development, culture, dispositions, or experience that influence social and emotional interactions and behavior.
  • engage in teaching practices that support children's and staff's development of social competence, emotional regulation, social knowledge, and social understanding.
  • recognize and model the ethical principles and educational values that are the foundation for early childhood education and the basis for choosing guidance techniques to support children's social and emotional development.
  • identify and practice elements of personal development that support early childhood educational professionals' ability to implement and model respectful relationships with co-workers, families, and children.
  • examine children's social, cultural, familial, developmental, and experiential backgrounds, including adverse childhood experiences, when developing plans to support the children's social and emotional development.

ECE 324 Post Practicum Seminar in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:18 - 54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 320 and 321 with grades of "C" or better; Employment in the Sacramento City College Child Development Center
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must show proof of negative Tuberculosis as well as immunizations or immunity to Tetanus, Diphtheria, Acellular Pertussis (TDAP), measles, and rubella. Annual flu shots, a physician's exemption from the flu shot, or a statement declining the shot are also required prior to participating in the lab.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed for students who have completed both ECE 320 and 321 and are working in a classroom as staff. The course supports students as they transition into taking responsibility for a classroom including ongoing curriculum development, assessment, guidance, and teaching to the needs of individual children. The course includes strategies for working with families and fellow staff members from diverse cultures and backgrounds.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • design a classroom environment to meet the needs of a specific group of children.
  • complete the procedures to prepare a classroom to welcome new children and families, including how to have an open house, prepare cubbies, meet parents/guardians, explain sign in procedures, and organize other classroom paperwork.
  • develop curriculum over a period of months to meet and build upon the children's social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development.
  • meet with parents/guardians of young children to discuss strategies to deal with behavior and development issues using a culturally sensitive and strength-based approach.
  • complete ongoing and required assessments for children in the program.
  • understand the complexity of working with staff members from diverse cultural, socio-economic, linguistic, and educational backgrounds to offer a developmentally appropriate program.

ECE 326 Making Learning Visible Through Observation and Documentation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 and 312 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course applies critical and reflective thinking to observation and assessment of young children’s development. It prepares teachers of young children to use observation, documentation, and interpretation strategies to improve program quality in early childhood settings. Multiple forms of child assessment and early childhood program assessment are explored.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare the purpose, value, and use of formal and informal assessments, including ethical and legal concerns.
  • evaluate the strengths and limitations of common assessment tools with respect to children’s diverse cultures, home languages, and developmental capabilities.
  • recommend changes to play environments, guidance strategies, curriculum activities, and care routines based on systematically recorded observational data that documents children's actions, ideas, and feelings.
  • demonstrate children's developmental progress using observational documentation of children's ideas and behavior.
  • analyze the effectiveness of photo documentation in conveying how young children learn within quality early childhood settings.
  • identify how observation and documentation can be integrated into communications with families regarding their children's learning and development.

ECE 330 Infant and Toddler Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an examination of the development of children from conception to three years of age. The course includes information on the brain development that occurs during the first three years of life in typically developing infants. The course presents research on physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and language development to assist parents and professionals in understanding the importance of infancy in human development.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between typical and atypical development in the areas of motor, cognitive, language, emotional, and social development during the first three years.
  • describe and explain the importance and scope of early brain development in the first three years of human life.
  • describe the influences of genetics and the environment in development.
  • examine developmental research to identify critical issues in the development and care of infants during the prenatal period, birth, and the first three years of life.
  • compare and contrast cultural practices surrounding prenatal development, childbirth, and infant care and why and how such practices influence development of the individual child.
  • synthesize the role of public policy as related to infant child care, mental health services, and maternal outcomes.

ECE 331 Care and Education of Infants and Toddlers

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 330 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ECE 312 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course applies current research in infant development to the teaching and care of infants in group settings. Emphasis is on early childhood education principles and practices as applied to the care and education of infants from birth to three years of age. It includes strategies for designing, implementing, and evaluating group care programs for infants.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate and implement infant group care programs using infant development research in program planning, including the principles of primary care, continuity of care, and small groups.
  • synthesize common infant guidance and interaction techniques and select strategies that support infant social and emotional development.
  • design routines for feeding, diapering, toileting, and sleeping that reflect respect for individual development and nurture competence and self-esteem in infants.
  • recognize cultural differences in family values involved in the care and rearing of infants and develop or modify guidelines to respect cultural values as much as possible in caregiving practices.
  • identify elements of appropriate curriculum for infants and critique curriculum standards, create curriculum that responds to individual infant developmental needs and interests.
  • assess the operation of group care programs for infants using licensing regulations set forth by the state of California, Infant Environmental Rating Scale, and California Department of Education Infant Toddler Foundations.
  • review and practice common assessment tools used for developmental assessments of infants, describe strategies working with atypical infants and their families.

ECE 334 Laboratory with Infants and Toddlers

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 312 or 330 with a grade of "C" or better; Students must have completed ECE 331 (Education and Care of Infants in Group Settings) with a grade of "C" or better or be concurrently enrolled in ECE 331.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Current tuberculosis clearance is required prior to participating in lab hours
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This class provides experience working with infants and toddlers in a group care program. It is designed as a practicum/laboratory for those who have completed or are concurrently enrolled in ECE 331. This course requires participation in a designated, supervised infant-toddler care setting for three hours per week with infants and/or toddlers. Students must be supervised by a staff member holding the Master Teacher Permit or higher during their lab hours. Current clearances for tuberculosis and required immunizations are required prior to participating in lab hours.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • participate in group care programs for infants that use current research based practices and operate with the principles of primary care, continuity of care, and small groups.
  • compare and contrast common infant guidance and interaction techniques and select strategies that recognize individual temperaments and incorporate multiple strategies to support infant social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development.
  • implement routines for feeding, diapering, toileting, and sleeping that reflect respect for individual development and appreciate cultural differences in family values surrounding the care and rearing of infants, as well as develop or modify guidelines to respect cultural values as much as possible while nurturing competence and self-esteem in infants.
  • evaluate infant care spaces based on quality criteria (Infant Environmental Rating Scale) and licensing regulations and for activities, feeding, changing, sleeping, and outdoor play that respond to infants developmental needs.
  • identify elements of appropriate curriculum (California Department of Education Infant Toddler Foundations) for infants, critique curriculum standards, and create curriculum that responds to infant developmental needs and interests.
  • review and practice development assessments using anecdotal observations.

ECE 342 Constructive Math and Science in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The course is an introduction to the constructivist approach to teaching mathematics and science in early childhood education. The content and teaching techniques support the perspective that children construct knowledge through a dynamic, interactive process that facilitates their development of working theories relating to math and science. The course introduces concepts aligned with California Preschool Learning Foundations in Mathematics and the California Common Core Curriculum Standards.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the constructivist approach to teaching in early childhood education.
  • connect concepts of the constructivist approach to design and implement curriculum in math and science that supports children's conceptual understanding.
  • demonstrate instructional techniques that encourage and support children's active engagement in the development of their comprehension and knowledge in math and science.
  • identify key skills and concepts children build throughout early childhood and provide meaningful opportunities for children to apply and master these skills and concepts to develop and identity in math and science.
  • integrate, investigate, and imbed into early care and education classrooms, engaging and developmentally appropriate, constructivist curriculum based on statewide standards.
  • develop engaging lessons and activities that support the development of children's conceptual understanding of math and science through problem solving, experiments, investigations, and asking questions.
  • assess mathematic and science curriculum concepts based on knowledge of relevant research and knowledge of child development.
  • distinguish between providing children with opportunities to investigate important concepts and constructing knowledge in mathematics and science from drill and practice worksheets or product driven lessons.
  • apply knowledge of the constructivist approach to design curriculum that is culturally respectful and inclusive as well as considerate of children's prior experiences gaining knowledge about the world.

ECE 343 Language and Literacy Development in Early Childhood

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ECE 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course prepares early childhood educators to recognize, create, and support developmentally appropriate emergent language and literacy experiences of young children. The knowledge of the stages of development in language and literacy will improve early childhood educators' abilities to support language and literacy in a play based curriculum. The course will address the development of language and literacy for children learning more than one language and children with special needs. The course emphasizes the importance of building a strong foundation in the use of language, both spoken and written prior to first grade.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the elements of language and emergent literacy development from the earliest communication to use of print and mark making, including children with exposure to more than one language and children with special needs.
  • analyze developmental patterns and developmental continuum in early literacy and research-based instructional practices that support children in building a foundation for reading and writing.
  • analyze the developmental continuum of reading and writing and use it in developing developmentally appropriate practices, expectations, and goals for young children's achievement in reading and writing.
  • create, plan, implement, and evaluate print rich literacy environments for children that offer numerous opportunities for children to experiment with and practice language and literacy skills, use print and symbols to express thoughts and ideas, including oral language and vocabulary development in conversations, narratives, and for the purposes of communication in the context of daily routines and in their self-initiated play activities.
  • identify how young children's mark making develops from drawing to the use of letters and make use of this development progression to initate activities that support and respect children's use of scribbles, symbols, and phonetic or invented spelling as they use language to express meaning.
  • analyze and select quality children's literature, including the tradition of story telling, and create ways to use quality books, poems, and stories in the classroom in ways that interest and develop positive regard for books and stories in young children
  • describe ways of involving families in their young children's emerging literacy experiences.
  • intergate strategies in the classroom for adapting emergent literacy practices for individual and cultural differences, including English language learners, and involving and supporting families in understanding and contributing to their children's emerging language and literacy interests and skills.

ECE 350 Introduction to Elementary Teaching with Field Experience

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Current TB clearance is required by state law for all volunteers/teachers in education programs. The livescan background check is required by some local school districts.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID EDUC 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides students an opportunity to explore the field of K-8 teaching and the career of teaching. The requirements and education required to attain a teaching credential will be examined. It includes a supervised structured field placement of three hours weekly (minimum of 45 hours per semester) in a local public elementary school with a college-approved certificated teacher. The weekly class meetings focus on the profession of teaching, career selection, children's developmental domains and influences on development such as family, community, race, and culture. The students will practice and develop teaching skills in observation, communication, and cultural competency. Students' field experiences will integrate and apply the course content.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the role and function of the teacher in the public school setting as in the California Standards for Teaching Profession and the state adopted Teaching Performance Expectations.
  • define academic requirements and experiences needed to obtain a teaching credential.
  • interpret and apply theories related to all domains of child and adolescent development and be able to integrate developmental theory into instructional practices and teaching.
  • demonstrate awareness of current social forces and issues in education impacting the public schools and the effect of these on children with diverse developmental needs in order to effectively demonstrate cultural competency in relationships with other teachers, students, and families in an educational setting.
  • identify and explain the diversity of the student population and how this diversity relates to issues in education as well as, recognize and describe individual differences among students and identify strategies and accommodations used to address these differences.
  • use research and personal observations to identify student's instructional needs to provide differentiated instruction and support for student's success in state adopted academic content and performance standards.
  • make appropriate decisions for instruction, assessment, homework, and classroom management policies, which take into consideration current research, equitable instruction, behavior management and guidance strategies.

ECE 360 Art and Music in Early Childhood

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a study of the use of creative art and music in early childhood education programs. The appropriate use of art materials and music activities for children at different developmental stages will be the focus of the course. Children's use of visual arts and music to represent their experiences and feelings will be examined as a developmental stage in the use of symbols and the development of literacy. Activities using music and movement to build community, share cultures and traditions, facilitate transitions, and in classroom management will be presented. The integration of art and music across the curriculum and the adaptation of these processes to support young children's overall development will be emphasized.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the developmental stages of children's art and music.
  • recognize the importance of creative art and music in supporting development in the cognitive, physical, social, emotional, and creative domains of development.
  • design and adapt developmentally appropriate and culturally respectful art and music experiences for children in different stages of development or with differing abilities.
  • differentiate the value of creative art experiences versus teacher-directed activities in children's development of autonomy and self-esteem.
  • identify the significant elements of the visual arts and music and how these support children's learning in early childhood and beyond.
  • establish a repertoire of songs, fingerplays, movement activities, chants, and rhymes to use as strategies for routines, managing behavior, and use in group times and community building.
  • identify and use culturally diverse music and movement experiences to introduce and involve children in the music traditions of many cultures, including the culture of Early Childhood Education.

ECE 400 Children with Exceptional Needs

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 312 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is an overview of the developmental issues, characteristics, and learning differences of children from birth through adolescence with exceptional needs, including gifted and talented. Current educational strategies, including assessment and curriculum design will be presented. Community resources, advocacy, and challenges for children with exceptional needs and their families will be examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze how children with exceptional developmental needs differ from children with typical development from birth through adolescence.
  • explain the legal processes involved in special education, including historical influences and the role of advocacy.
  • examine assessment and educational strategies for children with exceptional needs, including the need for special adaptions in the learning environment.
  • interpret the ways in which children with exceptional needs impact their families and its members.
  • describe support services and community resources available for children with exceptional needs and their families.
  • generate activities that meet the unique needs of children with exceptional needs.

ECE 401 Field Experience in Inclusive Settings

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 and 312 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:ECE 400
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must show evidence of a negative test or chest X-ray clearance for tuberculosis as well as required immunizations. Students may need to submit to fingerprints as a requirement for entry into a school setting. A fee will be required.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides experience working in a school environment with children and youth who have disabilities. It is designed as a laboratory for those who have completed or are concurrently enrolled in ECE 400. The course covers skills for students who want to be general educators, special educators, school and social service providers, and/or community members, who are essential in providing inclusive/integrated environments for differently-abled children and youth. Environmental modifications including classroom, school, agency, and community settings are studied. Classroom modifications in curriculum, assessment, behavior management, and instructional methods are examined. This course meets the requirement for special education in inclusive settings. Students must supply their own transportation to selected elementary school placements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • synthesize characteristics and behaviors of students with disabilities in terms of program and developmental needs with the role of the classroom educators.
  • identify strategies to promote student growth in social, academic, motor, and self-help domains.
  • discuss the importance of working collaboratively with professionals from multiple disciplines in meeting educational needs of students with disabilities.
  • communicate with other professionals, paraprofessionals, and families.
  • work with students with disabilities from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds as well as their families.

ECE 402 Infants with Atypical Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ECE 330 and ECE 312 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the characteristics of atypical infant assessment procedures and techniques for intervention in the developmental areas of sensory stimulation and integration, motor development, cognition, language, social, and self-help skills. The course will explore community services, agencies, career opportunities in fields related to the infant with atypical development.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • synthesize biological, genetic, and environmental factors that impact typical development during the prenatal and infancy periods of development.
  • describe early intervention services that are provided to infants and toddlers.
  • apply the skills needed to work with diverse families and the infant with atypical development.
  • utilize screening assessment and evaluation tools and to follow appropriate intervention techniques as prescribed by professional staff.

ECE 406 Field Experience Working with Children with Special Needs

  • Units:4
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 and 400 with grades of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must show proof of clearance for T.B. and required immunizations. Students may be required to pay a fee for fingerprinting.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides supervised experience working with children with special needs in an inclusive early care and education setting. Topics include integration strategies, classroom environments, and individualized instructional strategies for children. Emphasis will be on creating modifications, accommodations, or adaptations to the environment. In this supervised field experience course, students are enrolled in both a lecture and lab section. Students are required to attend a lab section each week where they have the opportunity to apply and practice what they are learning in the lecture section. The students will be assigned to the Campus Child Development Center during specific times of the day for supervised laboratory experiences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • integrate developmentally-appropriate and individually appropriate teaching techniques in a full inclusion early care and education setting.
  • synthesize developmentally and individually appropriate practices with theory and practice as they apply to children with special needs.
  • interpret and apply assessment techniques and instruments for children with special needs.
  • assess one's own teaching experiences to guide and inform practice.
  • develop respectful and reciprocal relationships with families.
  • develop an understanding of how professionals work in teams to help families negotiate services for children with special needs.

ECE 415 Children's Health, Safety and Nutrition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 220
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

The key components that ensure the health, safety, and nutrition of both children and staff will be identified along with the importance of collaboration with families and health professionals. Students will be introduced to early childhood curriculum, regulations, standards, policies, and procedures related to child health, safety, and nutrition. Course emphasis is placed on integrating and maintaining the optimal health, safety, and nutritional concepts in everyday planning and program development for all children.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe strategies used to promote health, safety, and nutrition of children and adults in early childhood settings.
  • evaluate and design environments for both positive and negative impacts on children’s health and safety.
  • identify regulations, standards, policies, and procedures related to health, safety, and nutrition in early childhood settings.
  • plan economical and nutritional menus (meals and snacks) for children that meet current state and federal guidelines.
  • identify characteristics of abuse and neglect and demonstrate knowledge of mandated child abuse reporting procedures.
  • recall symptoms and management of common communicable diseases and other health conditions that effect young children.
  • assess strategies to maximize the mental, physical, and emotional health in programs for all children in accordance with culturally, linguistic, and developmentally sound practice.

ECE 419 Healthy Young Children in Group Care

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers information necessary for providers to maintain safe and healthy environments for young children in their care. Topics include preventive health practices, infectious disease control, injury prevention, playground safety, prevention of lead exposure, and emergency preparedness. This course meets the requirements of mandated health and safety training for child care providers.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the responsibilities of early care and education providers in supporting safe and healthy program practices for young children.
  • demonstrate skills in developing and maintaining standards and program practices that protect children from illness and injury in group care settings.
  • recognize symptoms of common infectious diseases in young children and identify practices to prevent and control their spread.
  • identify local and online resources and regulations relating to health and safety practices.
  • assess practices in early care and education programs for appropriate and proactive health and safety practices.

ECE 420 Administration I: Programs in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 and 312 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is an introductory course in the elements of program planning, legal requirements, supervision, and personnel administration for early childhood education and care facilities. The emphasis in this course is on privately funded facilities licensed under the Department of Social Services Community Care Licensing, Title 22, Health and Safety Code.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate and apply a personal philosophy of working with children, families, and staff in an early care and education environment.
  • reference, interpret, and apply the legal regulations of child care centers (Title 22).
  • describe the roles and responsibilities of the early childhood site supervisor and director.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of program planning: budgets, reports, personnel management, equipping program, enrollment, staffing, and evaluation.
  • formulate operational procedures based on best practices for developmentally appropriate programs.
  • develop policies related to program services such as nutrition, health, and safety standards following regulatory requirements.
  • interpret and apply a professional code of ethics.

ECE 422 Administration II: Personnel and Leadership in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 320 or 420 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Students should have at least one year of experience working with children in a child care and development program.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This is an advanced course in the administration and coordination of multi-faceted Child Development Programs. The focus of the course will be programs funded with public funds or administered by a board of directors. Additional emphasis will be on personnel management including teacher classifications under the Child Development Permit Matrix. This course meets the requirements of the Education Code under Title 5 and the Commission for Teacher Credentialing, California Site Supervisor Permit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the role and responsibilities of the administrator and the the interaction of the administrator with families, volunteers, and the community, including the principles and practices of the code of ethics for early childhood educators as defined by the National Association for the Education of Young Children.
  • examine the breadth and scope of publicly funded child development programs in California.
  • reference, interpret, and apply the legal regulations of publicly funded child development programs in California (Title 5).
  • evaluate the required application of Title 22 legal regulations.
  • articulate and design procedures that are characteristic of high quality child care.
  • analyze management issues in relation to budgets, grant writing and earnings, working with boards, and supervising agencies.
  • examine legal and ethical responsibilities related to the rights of families, rights of children/students, rights of employees.
  • describe various evaluation tools in measuring overall program quality.

ECE 424 Adult Supervision: Mentoring in a Collaborative Learning Setting

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course is a study of the methods and principles of the collaborative learning approach with emphasis on supervising teachers in early childhood education. Emphasis is on the role of a mentor who functions to guide the teaching team while simultaneously addressing the needs of children, parents, and their staff. This course satisfies the adult supervision requirement for receiving a Supervising Teacher Permit from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the role and function of a mentor, as a role model, in guiding and evaluating the teaching team.
  • analyze the developmental stages and learning strategies of teachers and supervisors.
  • recognize developmentally appropriate environments for young children while fostering the growth of the teaching team.
  • facilitate respectful interactions between all learners: the children, staff, and parents.
  • review and analyze the role of the mentor in leadership and advocacy in the field of Early Childhood Education.
  • describe relationship-based mentoring and communication strategies.

ECE 430 Culture and Diversity in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory: ENGWR300 and ECE 312 with grades "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area VI
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 230
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course covers culturally responsive care and education in early childhood settings. It includes the study of socio-cultural issues as they vary across the diverse cultures represented in the classroom and as they impact a child's development. Included are strategies for interacting with diverse families and helping children negotiate and resolve conflicts caused by cultural differences, with a focus on using an anti-bias approach in the classroom.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose rationale and goals for a multicultural, anti-bias early childhood program and describe various techniques teachers can use when responding to children's developing discriminatory behaviors.
  • identify stereotypic and biased classroom materials and environments and investigate alternative materials for classroom and student use.
  • reflect on and assess on one's own cultural background and upbringing and identify how this experience impacts personal perceptions and interactions with others.
  • construct multicultural curriculum that promotes the valuing of diversity and elimination of stereotypic themes, in order to implement care-giving techniques and problem-resolution practices that respond to the diversity of cultures represented in a program, including differences in race, gender roles, socio-economic status, abilities and disabilities, and family structure.
  • examine and investigate how children develop an awareness of differences and how prejudice is formed in the early years.
  • identify ways in which cultural and family patterns affect children's behavior and learning.

ECE 495 Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 312 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education offers students the opportunity to explore topics and interests that are not available through a current semester's regular course offerings. Students must have a faculty member willing to support and evaluate the student's progress towards the student's learning objectives. UC transfer credit will be awarded only after the course has been evaluated by the enrolling UC campus. The units completed for this course cannot be counted toward the minimum 60 units required for admissions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • independently develop a proposed plan of study from the design stage to completion.
  • evaluate and reflect on personal skills, abilities, and knowledge.

ECE 498 Work Experience in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300, 312, and 314 with grades of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:In order to enroll students must be employed or volunteering in a position related to Early Childhood Education and enrolled in a minimum of 7 units, which may include Work Experience in Early Childhood Education. Students should be aware proof of negative Tuberculosis as well as immunizations or immunity to Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis, measles and rubella are required. Annual flu shots, a physician's exemption from the flu shot, or a statement declining the flu shot are required.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020

This course provides work experience in early childhood settings, primarily child care and development centers, with opportunities to work with children, infancy through the school age years. By combining volunteer or paid work experience with college training, jobs are used as earning settings. Enrollment is dependent on employment or on availability of voluntary work placement. Course content includes completions of Title 5 Education Code documents (i.e. Student Application, Learning Objectives, Time Sheet, and Evaluation), that document the student's progress and hours spent in the workplace. The student will be required to attend an orientation at the beginning of the course. Students must complete 75 hours of related paid work experience of 60 hours of related unpaid work experience, for one unit. an additional 75 hours of related paid work experience or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience is required for each additional unit. This course may be taken up to 4 times when there is new or expanded learning on the job for up to 16 units. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use developmentally effective teaching and learning strategies in working with infants, preschool, and school-age children in group settings that support their growth and development.
  • compare the day-to-day operation of an infant, preschool, or school-age center to developmentally appropriate practices and guidelines presented in course work.
  • gain skills in guidance, curriculum development and implementation, and management of routines while working with a diverse group of children.
  • integrate classroom work with solutions to on-the-job problems in their work setting.

ECE 499 Experimental Offering in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2020